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Abstract

Albert Erlebacher explores the main issues, changes, and growth that DePaul University experienced between 1950, when it almost lost its accreditation, and 1990, when it emerged as a major American Catholic university. DePaul’s expansion of its campus, the reforms and innovations made to its curricula, and the development of new programs and schools are discussed in detail. Changes in university leadership and governance are also described. DePaul’s experiences are placed within the broader context of changes and challenges occurring in American Catholic higher education during this time, especially as they relate to the Second Vatican Council. Additionally, DePaul needed to provide an intellectually rigorous education and qualify for increased federal funding during the Cold War to compete with public universities. Erlebacher explains how DePaul balanced these needs with its Vincentian character.

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