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Abigail HendersonFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

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Abstract

Background: Many women suffer from postpartum depression (PPD) and delay seeking treatment due to a misunderstanding of the disorder and a shame of their depressive symptoms. These depressive symptoms have adverse effects for both the mother and the infant.

Study Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed analysis that examines the efficacy and effects of Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) in the treatment of women with postpartum depression. With a deeper understanding of treatment options for postpartum depression, rates of this debilitating disorder may decrease.

Method: A search was conducted utilizing databases that included PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete, PsycInfo, and Academic Search Complete. Terms, phrases and key words used in the search included midwife, midwives, midwifery, postpartum depression, postnatal depression, interpersonal psychotherapy, interpersonal therapy. All of the selected articles were analyzed to determine relation and relevance to the research question.

Results: After examining the seven articles, four major common effects of IPT in the treatment of PPD were found. Those effects included depression, social support, marital functioning, and mother-infant relationships.

Conclusion: IPT appears to be a promising treatment in order to not only decrease depressive symptoms but also increase marital functioning, social support, and mother-infant bonding. More research should be performed in order to evaluate the most effective ways to perform and use IPT in order to treat this depressive.

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM

The Effects of Interpersonal Therapy in the Treatment of Postpartum Depression: An Integrative Literature Review

Abstract

Background: Many women suffer from postpartum depression (PPD) and delay seeking treatment due to a misunderstanding of the disorder and a shame of their depressive symptoms. These depressive symptoms have adverse effects for both the mother and the infant.

Study Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed analysis that examines the efficacy and effects of Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) in the treatment of women with postpartum depression. With a deeper understanding of treatment options for postpartum depression, rates of this debilitating disorder may decrease.

Method: A search was conducted utilizing databases that included PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete, PsycInfo, and Academic Search Complete. Terms, phrases and key words used in the search included midwife, midwives, midwifery, postpartum depression, postnatal depression, interpersonal psychotherapy, interpersonal therapy. All of the selected articles were analyzed to determine relation and relevance to the research question.

Results: After examining the seven articles, four major common effects of IPT in the treatment of PPD were found. Those effects included depression, social support, marital functioning, and mother-infant relationships.

Conclusion: IPT appears to be a promising treatment in order to not only decrease depressive symptoms but also increase marital functioning, social support, and mother-infant bonding. More research should be performed in order to evaluate the most effective ways to perform and use IPT in order to treat this depressive.