Presenter Information

Taylor LooperFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: In the United States African-American women are three to four more times likely to experience pregnancy related deaths than other women. Despite this fact, few studies have been conducted to explore barriers contributing to the increased maternal mortality rate in African-American women.

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to understand the implications that barriers to and lack of prenatal care have on maternal mortality amongst African-American women, as well as how patient-provider relationships affect the maternal mortality rate.

Methods: An integrative literature review was conducted to review existing peer-reviewed articles regarding the topic using the CINAHL database. Search terms included: African-American women and maternal mortality, black women and maternal mortality, black women and prenatal care, black women and antenatal care, African-American women and prenatal care, African-American women and antenatal care, African-American women and patient-provider interactions, black women and patient-provider interactions/ relationships

Results: Three major barriers having an impact on the increased maternal mortality rate amongst African-American women were identified: 1) delayed seeking of prenatal care, 2) lack of insurance, 3) poor relationships between patient and provider due to perceptions of discriminatory practices, and lack of meaningful relationships.

Conclusion: African-American women need better access to prenatal care and better patient-provider relationships in order to potentially decrease the high maternal mortality rates experienced within their population. There is a need for further research on how to combat these factors so that improved outcomes can be seen.

Keywords: African-American women, maternal mortality, prenatal care, patient-provider relationships

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM

Barriers Contributing to the Increased Maternal Mortality Rate in African-American Women: An Integrative Literature Review

Abstract

Background: In the United States African-American women are three to four more times likely to experience pregnancy related deaths than other women. Despite this fact, few studies have been conducted to explore barriers contributing to the increased maternal mortality rate in African-American women.

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to understand the implications that barriers to and lack of prenatal care have on maternal mortality amongst African-American women, as well as how patient-provider relationships affect the maternal mortality rate.

Methods: An integrative literature review was conducted to review existing peer-reviewed articles regarding the topic using the CINAHL database. Search terms included: African-American women and maternal mortality, black women and maternal mortality, black women and prenatal care, black women and antenatal care, African-American women and prenatal care, African-American women and antenatal care, African-American women and patient-provider interactions, black women and patient-provider interactions/ relationships

Results: Three major barriers having an impact on the increased maternal mortality rate amongst African-American women were identified: 1) delayed seeking of prenatal care, 2) lack of insurance, 3) poor relationships between patient and provider due to perceptions of discriminatory practices, and lack of meaningful relationships.

Conclusion: African-American women need better access to prenatal care and better patient-provider relationships in order to potentially decrease the high maternal mortality rates experienced within their population. There is a need for further research on how to combat these factors so that improved outcomes can be seen.

Keywords: African-American women, maternal mortality, prenatal care, patient-provider relationships