Presenter Information

Kamila KowalewskiFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Currently in the United States roughly 17.3 million adults have experienced at least one major depressive episode and this percentage was highest among young adults aged 18 to 25. Furthermore, the millennial population specifically has seen an increase in major depression by 31%. There is current research that dictates that social media use can negatively impact one’s mental well-being and increase depressive symptoms in individuals in this generation.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to use current studies and research to examine the association between negative experiences on social media and its influence on depressive symptoms such as anxiety, and social isolation in millennials.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted through the DePaul University Library database and articles were obtained from CINAHL, Complete, Pubmed, and Psyc-Info. A search was conducted using the following terms: depression, anxiety, social media, Facebook, Instagram, adolescence, young adults, and millennials.

Results: Six studies have met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Social media use was found to be directly related to depressive symptoms and anxiety in young adults. Social comparison and feedback seeking behaviors were associated with depressive symptoms in adolescents. Those with depression were high users of social media and some experienced negative social interactions and cyberbullying. Higher daily social media use was associated with greater anxiety symptoms and an increased likelihood of having an anxiety disorder. A negative experience on social media was strongly associated with depressive symptoms.

Conclusion: Social media use has to be integrated into the dialogue between patient and provider. Negative behavior or negative interaction with social media is what needs to be changed in order to prevent any potential harm to the individual whether it’s psychological or physical. Early identification of mental health disorders and early treatment is necessary.

Key words: depression, anxiety, social media, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, adolescents, adolescence, youth, teenagers, young adults, millennials

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 AM

Social Media Influences on Depressive Symptoms in Millennials: An Integrative Literature Review

Abstract

Background: Currently in the United States roughly 17.3 million adults have experienced at least one major depressive episode and this percentage was highest among young adults aged 18 to 25. Furthermore, the millennial population specifically has seen an increase in major depression by 31%. There is current research that dictates that social media use can negatively impact one’s mental well-being and increase depressive symptoms in individuals in this generation.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to use current studies and research to examine the association between negative experiences on social media and its influence on depressive symptoms such as anxiety, and social isolation in millennials.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted through the DePaul University Library database and articles were obtained from CINAHL, Complete, Pubmed, and Psyc-Info. A search was conducted using the following terms: depression, anxiety, social media, Facebook, Instagram, adolescence, young adults, and millennials.

Results: Six studies have met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Social media use was found to be directly related to depressive symptoms and anxiety in young adults. Social comparison and feedback seeking behaviors were associated with depressive symptoms in adolescents. Those with depression were high users of social media and some experienced negative social interactions and cyberbullying. Higher daily social media use was associated with greater anxiety symptoms and an increased likelihood of having an anxiety disorder. A negative experience on social media was strongly associated with depressive symptoms.

Conclusion: Social media use has to be integrated into the dialogue between patient and provider. Negative behavior or negative interaction with social media is what needs to be changed in order to prevent any potential harm to the individual whether it’s psychological or physical. Early identification of mental health disorders and early treatment is necessary.

Key words: depression, anxiety, social media, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, adolescents, adolescence, youth, teenagers, young adults, millennials

 

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