Presenter Information

Kamila BarnakFollow

Start Date

18-6-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

18-6-2019 10:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Compassion fatigue and burnout are significant issues among intensive care unit nurses. Many nurses leave their job in the ICU after a few years due to their negative experiences. This is an issue, as many baby boomers are aging and need to be cared for; at the same time many ICU nurses are retiring and need to be replaced. However, there are not a lot of young nurses willing to take their place and the ones who do, leave after a short period of working.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that contribute to compassion fatigue in ICU nurses as well as seek out potential interventions that may help alleviate this issue, improve job satisfaction and promote healthy work environments.

Method: An integrative review of literature was conducted. The factors contributing to burnout and compassion fatigue were identified as well as interventions that researchers have studied and proved to show positive feedback from ICU nurses.

Research Questions: (1) What factors contribute to compassion fatigue and burnout among ICU nurses? (2) What interventions/coping mechanisms are effective and optimal for moving from high turnover to better transition of experienced to new nurses in the ICU?

Findings/Results: The data analysis revealed that contributing factors to compassion fatigue are moral distress, poor support from management, and educational attainment. Successful coping mechanisms were identified as meaningful recognition, mindfulness, and opportunity for professional and personal growth. These aspects are key to nurse retention.

Conclusion: Based on the identification of the common factors that contribute to compassion fatigue and successful coping mechanisms, the most significant factor is support. This support comes in many forms, such as team and managerial support, supporting opportunities to improve one’s education and support of self through self-care techniques such as mindfulness.

Keywords: compassion fatigue, coping, self-care, intensive care unit, critical care, nursing

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Jun 18th, 9:00 AM Jun 18th, 10:30 AM

Compassion Fatigue and Coping ICU Nursing: An Integrative Review of Literature

Abstract

Background: Compassion fatigue and burnout are significant issues among intensive care unit nurses. Many nurses leave their job in the ICU after a few years due to their negative experiences. This is an issue, as many baby boomers are aging and need to be cared for; at the same time many ICU nurses are retiring and need to be replaced. However, there are not a lot of young nurses willing to take their place and the ones who do, leave after a short period of working.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that contribute to compassion fatigue in ICU nurses as well as seek out potential interventions that may help alleviate this issue, improve job satisfaction and promote healthy work environments.

Method: An integrative review of literature was conducted. The factors contributing to burnout and compassion fatigue were identified as well as interventions that researchers have studied and proved to show positive feedback from ICU nurses.

Research Questions: (1) What factors contribute to compassion fatigue and burnout among ICU nurses? (2) What interventions/coping mechanisms are effective and optimal for moving from high turnover to better transition of experienced to new nurses in the ICU?

Findings/Results: The data analysis revealed that contributing factors to compassion fatigue are moral distress, poor support from management, and educational attainment. Successful coping mechanisms were identified as meaningful recognition, mindfulness, and opportunity for professional and personal growth. These aspects are key to nurse retention.

Conclusion: Based on the identification of the common factors that contribute to compassion fatigue and successful coping mechanisms, the most significant factor is support. This support comes in many forms, such as team and managerial support, supporting opportunities to improve one’s education and support of self through self-care techniques such as mindfulness.

Keywords: compassion fatigue, coping, self-care, intensive care unit, critical care, nursing