Presenter Information

Jordan RogersFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-8-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Heart failure affects 6.5 million people in the United States and depression occurs in approximately 20-50% of heart failure patients. Depression can lead to complications and increased mortality, so it is necessary to examine the effect of depression on heart failure patients.

Objective: To investigate how depression in heart failure patients affects medication adherence and patient outcomes.

Methods: An integrative literature review was completed by searching databases: CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycInfo. Search terms included: heart failure, depression, medication adherence or compliance, anxiety, and outcomes. Studies included had to be published between 2012 and 2018 and available in English.

Results: Most studies found a significant relationship between depression in heart failure patients and decreased medication adherence. Other studies in this review found that patient outcomes were negatively associated with patient depression. Outcomes were measured by different patient variables across studies, including hospitalization rates, patient symptoms, and self-efficacy.

Conclusion: Depression in heart failure patients leads to decreased medication adherence and more unfavorable patient outcomes. It is important for healthcare providers to be aware of this effect, and to screen heart failure patients for depression in order to facilitate treatment in this population.

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Aug 17th, 10:00 AM Aug 17th, 11:30 AM

The Effects of Depression on Medication Compliance and Patient Outcome in Heart Failure

Abstract

Background: Heart failure affects 6.5 million people in the United States and depression occurs in approximately 20-50% of heart failure patients. Depression can lead to complications and increased mortality, so it is necessary to examine the effect of depression on heart failure patients.

Objective: To investigate how depression in heart failure patients affects medication adherence and patient outcomes.

Methods: An integrative literature review was completed by searching databases: CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycInfo. Search terms included: heart failure, depression, medication adherence or compliance, anxiety, and outcomes. Studies included had to be published between 2012 and 2018 and available in English.

Results: Most studies found a significant relationship between depression in heart failure patients and decreased medication adherence. Other studies in this review found that patient outcomes were negatively associated with patient depression. Outcomes were measured by different patient variables across studies, including hospitalization rates, patient symptoms, and self-efficacy.

Conclusion: Depression in heart failure patients leads to decreased medication adherence and more unfavorable patient outcomes. It is important for healthcare providers to be aware of this effect, and to screen heart failure patients for depression in order to facilitate treatment in this population.