Presenter Information

Yuliya BandurovychFollow

Start Date

19-3-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

19-3-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Individuals struggling with depression differ from those without depression in their cognitive responses to life events. In spite of the prevalence of depression among college students, there are limited studies available to gain a comprehensive understanding of the cognitive responses associated with depression in this specific population.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to use research published within the last five years to identify cognitive responses commonly utilized by college students with depression and the consequent risky behaviors which manifest from these responses.

Methods: An integrative review of literature was conducted using Academic Search Complete, PsycInfo, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL). The search terms used in the searchers were depression, college students, university students, graduate students, undergraduate students, cognitive response, cognitive style, cognitive form, response style, emotional regulation strategy, and cognitive process. A total of thirteen articles were selected to address the objectives of this review of literature.

Results: Two cognitive responses commonly utilized by college students with depression were negative cognitive style and rumination (with subtypes of brooding and reflection). The use of these maladaptive cognitive responses among college students with depression was found to be associated with a handful of risky behaviors, such as suicidal ideation, unhealthy eating practices, sleep onset latency, excessive alcohol consumption, and career indecision.

Conclusion: This review found that college students with depression used maladaptive cognitive responses, which contributed to an increase in risky behaviors. The variety of risky behaviors that are associated with depression can guide school administrators, counselors, and health care providers in establishing prevention and treatment tools and programs across college campuses.

Key words: depression, college students, university students, graduate students, undergraduate students, cognitive response, cognitive style, cognitive form, response style, emotional regulation strategy, cognitive process

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Mar 19th, 10:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:30 AM

Cognitive Responses Commonly Used by College Students in the Context of Depression and their Consequent Manifestation as Risky Behaviors: An Integrative Review of Literature

Abstract

Background: Individuals struggling with depression differ from those without depression in their cognitive responses to life events. In spite of the prevalence of depression among college students, there are limited studies available to gain a comprehensive understanding of the cognitive responses associated with depression in this specific population.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to use research published within the last five years to identify cognitive responses commonly utilized by college students with depression and the consequent risky behaviors which manifest from these responses.

Methods: An integrative review of literature was conducted using Academic Search Complete, PsycInfo, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL). The search terms used in the searchers were depression, college students, university students, graduate students, undergraduate students, cognitive response, cognitive style, cognitive form, response style, emotional regulation strategy, and cognitive process. A total of thirteen articles were selected to address the objectives of this review of literature.

Results: Two cognitive responses commonly utilized by college students with depression were negative cognitive style and rumination (with subtypes of brooding and reflection). The use of these maladaptive cognitive responses among college students with depression was found to be associated with a handful of risky behaviors, such as suicidal ideation, unhealthy eating practices, sleep onset latency, excessive alcohol consumption, and career indecision.

Conclusion: This review found that college students with depression used maladaptive cognitive responses, which contributed to an increase in risky behaviors. The variety of risky behaviors that are associated with depression can guide school administrators, counselors, and health care providers in establishing prevention and treatment tools and programs across college campuses.

Key words: depression, college students, university students, graduate students, undergraduate students, cognitive response, cognitive style, cognitive form, response style, emotional regulation strategy, cognitive process

 

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