Presenter Information

Samantha RifkinFollow

Start Date

19-3-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

19-3-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Background: Sexual assault, particularly rape, is considered to be the most severe form of trauma with long term health consequences. Of the estimated 9.3 to 43 percent of victims who seek initial medical care post assault, only 10 to 50 percent attend follow-up care. Objectives: The purpose of this integrated literature review is to identify factors directly and indirectly associated with sexual assault and rape victims attending follow up care. Methods: Peer review articles from 1998 to 2018 were selected from CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source, and PubMed. After examining 98 initially retrieved studies for inclusion and exclusion criteria, a final sample of five articles was obtained. Results: Treatment by a sexual assault nurse examiner, younger age, assault in the home, amnesia, alcohol use, prophylactic medications, possessing health insurance, prior use of mental healthcare services, and having a social support network were directly associated with use of follow up care services. Homelessness, psychiatric diagnosis, intimate partner assault, physical or mental disability, amnesia, a positive syphilis screening test at the initial visit, and drug, alcohol, or cocaine use were inversely associated with use of follow up care services. Conclusions: By exploring factors directly and negatively correlated with use of follow up care, healthcare professionals can identify barriers preventing victims from attending follow up care. Use of follow up care services with trusted and trained healthcare professionals will greatly improve the physical, emotional, and psychological health of sexual assault and rape victims.

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Mar 19th, 10:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:30 AM

Factors associated with follow up care use after sexual assault

Background: Sexual assault, particularly rape, is considered to be the most severe form of trauma with long term health consequences. Of the estimated 9.3 to 43 percent of victims who seek initial medical care post assault, only 10 to 50 percent attend follow-up care. Objectives: The purpose of this integrated literature review is to identify factors directly and indirectly associated with sexual assault and rape victims attending follow up care. Methods: Peer review articles from 1998 to 2018 were selected from CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source, and PubMed. After examining 98 initially retrieved studies for inclusion and exclusion criteria, a final sample of five articles was obtained. Results: Treatment by a sexual assault nurse examiner, younger age, assault in the home, amnesia, alcohol use, prophylactic medications, possessing health insurance, prior use of mental healthcare services, and having a social support network were directly associated with use of follow up care services. Homelessness, psychiatric diagnosis, intimate partner assault, physical or mental disability, amnesia, a positive syphilis screening test at the initial visit, and drug, alcohol, or cocaine use were inversely associated with use of follow up care services. Conclusions: By exploring factors directly and negatively correlated with use of follow up care, healthcare professionals can identify barriers preventing victims from attending follow up care. Use of follow up care services with trusted and trained healthcare professionals will greatly improve the physical, emotional, and psychological health of sexual assault and rape victims.