Start Date

18-3-2018 12:00 AM

End Date

19-3-2018 12:00 AM

Description

Aim: 1) To identify cultural influences and other barriers affecting HPV vaccination decisions, 2) To identify educational methods that can deliver HPV related information to Korean American (KA) parents effectively

Background: Given significant concerns about HPV infection, lower immunization rates, and higher cervical cancer risks facing Korean Americans, it is imperative to better understand the barriers to vaccination. Currently, there is no HPV-focused education program that considers the linguistic and cultural barriers of the KA community. Additionally, there is a lack of effective educational content and methods available to reach KA parents.

Methods: An exploratory, qualitative design was conducted. Content Analysis was used to identify major themes and sub-themes.

Results: Findings revealed four major themes and nine sub-themes from a total of twenty KA parent interviews. Major themes include: Knowledge and information, negative perception, health care provider influence, and socio-cultural determinants. Themes revealed that KA parents have a combination of similar and unique needs that need to be addressed in HPV related education. More information from trusted sources (health professionals) is needed and content should address safety, effectiveness, benefits, and financial resources. Findings also revealed a strong interest in parent guidance on providing sex education to their children. Effective methods suggested include in-person seminars with other parents and short (10 min) family videos in doctor’s office or on TV.

Conclusion: Further research is needed to gain a more in-depth understanding of KA parents' reluctance to HPV vaccination. Developing culturally sensitive HPV education programs can lead to higher immunization rates, lower risks of cervical cancer, and overall greater health promotion in KA communities.

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Mar 18th, 12:00 AM Mar 19th, 12:00 AM

Exploring the Need of HPV Education Programs in Korean American Communities

Aim: 1) To identify cultural influences and other barriers affecting HPV vaccination decisions, 2) To identify educational methods that can deliver HPV related information to Korean American (KA) parents effectively

Background: Given significant concerns about HPV infection, lower immunization rates, and higher cervical cancer risks facing Korean Americans, it is imperative to better understand the barriers to vaccination. Currently, there is no HPV-focused education program that considers the linguistic and cultural barriers of the KA community. Additionally, there is a lack of effective educational content and methods available to reach KA parents.

Methods: An exploratory, qualitative design was conducted. Content Analysis was used to identify major themes and sub-themes.

Results: Findings revealed four major themes and nine sub-themes from a total of twenty KA parent interviews. Major themes include: Knowledge and information, negative perception, health care provider influence, and socio-cultural determinants. Themes revealed that KA parents have a combination of similar and unique needs that need to be addressed in HPV related education. More information from trusted sources (health professionals) is needed and content should address safety, effectiveness, benefits, and financial resources. Findings also revealed a strong interest in parent guidance on providing sex education to their children. Effective methods suggested include in-person seminars with other parents and short (10 min) family videos in doctor’s office or on TV.

Conclusion: Further research is needed to gain a more in-depth understanding of KA parents' reluctance to HPV vaccination. Developing culturally sensitive HPV education programs can lead to higher immunization rates, lower risks of cervical cancer, and overall greater health promotion in KA communities.