Presenter Information

Holly Ann Douglas CharlesFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Obesity and excess weight occur more frequently in the psychiatric patient population. Inappropriate weight gain during in-patient treatment indicates long-term increases in weight. Children are particularly vulnerable to the ill effects of obesity with an increased risk of premature mortality and adult morbidity. Thus, it is imperative to minimize weight gain during psychiatric treatment. The purpose of this review was to identify factors contributing to weight gain in youth psychiatric patients, effective strategies to control modifiable risk factors, and the population that would benefit most from these strategies. An intensive review of literature was conducted. The search utilized multiple databases, including: MedLine, AccessMedicine, CINAHL, PsycInfo, ProQuest, PubMed and more. The search utilized the terms “weight gain” and “psychiatric” and was limited by subject “inpatient” and “children & youth”. Examination of literature revealed that weight-gain during psychiatric hospitalization occurs as a result of pharmacological treatment, psychiatric diagnosis, and in conjunction with certain lifestyle and environmental factors. Males and those with normal weight upon admission are particularly vulnerable to weight gain during treatment in a psychiatric facility. Management of weight may be achieved by pairing cognitive-behavioral therapy with educational sessions on diet, activity, motivation, and stress management. The effective management and prevention of inappropriate weight gain has not been adequately studied, especially during in-patient treatment. Future studies need to be conducted in order to improve health outcomes for this population.

Keywords: weight-gain; children; psychiatric; weight-gain risk factors; obesity, psychiatric medication, antipsychotics

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Factors Contributing to Weight-Gain in Pediatric Psychiatric Patients: An Integrative Literature Review

Obesity and excess weight occur more frequently in the psychiatric patient population. Inappropriate weight gain during in-patient treatment indicates long-term increases in weight. Children are particularly vulnerable to the ill effects of obesity with an increased risk of premature mortality and adult morbidity. Thus, it is imperative to minimize weight gain during psychiatric treatment. The purpose of this review was to identify factors contributing to weight gain in youth psychiatric patients, effective strategies to control modifiable risk factors, and the population that would benefit most from these strategies. An intensive review of literature was conducted. The search utilized multiple databases, including: MedLine, AccessMedicine, CINAHL, PsycInfo, ProQuest, PubMed and more. The search utilized the terms “weight gain” and “psychiatric” and was limited by subject “inpatient” and “children & youth”. Examination of literature revealed that weight-gain during psychiatric hospitalization occurs as a result of pharmacological treatment, psychiatric diagnosis, and in conjunction with certain lifestyle and environmental factors. Males and those with normal weight upon admission are particularly vulnerable to weight gain during treatment in a psychiatric facility. Management of weight may be achieved by pairing cognitive-behavioral therapy with educational sessions on diet, activity, motivation, and stress management. The effective management and prevention of inappropriate weight gain has not been adequately studied, especially during in-patient treatment. Future studies need to be conducted in order to improve health outcomes for this population.

Keywords: weight-gain; children; psychiatric; weight-gain risk factors; obesity, psychiatric medication, antipsychotics

 

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