Presenter Information

Melissa PinneyFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

The Comparison of Post Abortion Emotional Effects in African Americans and Other Races: An Integrative Literature Review

Faculty Sponsor: Elizabeth Hartman, PhD, RN

Abstract

Background: African American women tend to encounter pregnancy and infant loss twice as high as any other racial group; however, present research does not supply adequate information with regard to abortion concerning minority women. Consequently, African American females may be experiencing post abortion emotional effects and not be receiving proper mental health care.

Objective: To determine if African American women experience a higher rate of post abortion emotional effects compared to other races and what can be done to bring awareness to the community and aid in educating them about this topic.

Methods: A systemic integrated literature review search was conducted using the key words “post abortion, depression, blacks, and psychological” between the years 2006 to 2016.

Results: Post abortion emotional/psychological effects found in women, according to literature, include anxiety, grief, and post-traumatic stress disorder, to name a few. However, there are limited studies signifying a difference in the rate of these effects seen in African American women compared to other races.

Conclusion: This review found that women do indeed experience various emotional effects after a pregnancy loss, while others do not. The rate of the effects experienced in African Americans compared to other races was not as high as expected. There were limited studies focusing on this particular group. Nevertheless, with the limited data obtained, educating women and the community on these post-abortion emotional effects and the various coping methods that are available is a major step in helping to prevent long-term mental health issues in these women.

Key words: post abortion, depression, blacks, psychological

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

The Comparison of Post Abortion Emotional Effects in African Americans and Other Races

The Comparison of Post Abortion Emotional Effects in African Americans and Other Races: An Integrative Literature Review

Faculty Sponsor: Elizabeth Hartman, PhD, RN

Abstract

Background: African American women tend to encounter pregnancy and infant loss twice as high as any other racial group; however, present research does not supply adequate information with regard to abortion concerning minority women. Consequently, African American females may be experiencing post abortion emotional effects and not be receiving proper mental health care.

Objective: To determine if African American women experience a higher rate of post abortion emotional effects compared to other races and what can be done to bring awareness to the community and aid in educating them about this topic.

Methods: A systemic integrated literature review search was conducted using the key words “post abortion, depression, blacks, and psychological” between the years 2006 to 2016.

Results: Post abortion emotional/psychological effects found in women, according to literature, include anxiety, grief, and post-traumatic stress disorder, to name a few. However, there are limited studies signifying a difference in the rate of these effects seen in African American women compared to other races.

Conclusion: This review found that women do indeed experience various emotional effects after a pregnancy loss, while others do not. The rate of the effects experienced in African Americans compared to other races was not as high as expected. There were limited studies focusing on this particular group. Nevertheless, with the limited data obtained, educating women and the community on these post-abortion emotional effects and the various coping methods that are available is a major step in helping to prevent long-term mental health issues in these women.

Key words: post abortion, depression, blacks, psychological