Start Date

22-3-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-3-2019 11:30 AM

Description

Interventions to Detect and Manage the Psychological Effects in Adolescents Suffering from Acne: An Integrative Literature Review

Jimmie Fitzhugh and Rodne Serapio

Research Sponsor: Elizabeth P Anderson RN, PhD

Background: Acne is a chronic skin disorder that often presents in adolescents. The psychological effects that present with acne have been well researched and established. However, the interventions available to detect psychological effects, as well as their effectiveness and benefits, have not been organized or discussed.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to explore the screening tools that exist to detect and manage the psychological effects present in adolescents suffering from acne.

Methods: An integrative literature review was completed on ten research studies from 1996 to 2017. The final 10 eligible papers after searches, exclusion criteria were: 1 from Pubmed, 3 from Academic Search Complete, 4 from CINAHL, and 2 from PsychInfo. A Shimpuku and Norr (2012) diagram was used to assist in visualization of the results. Data analysis was utilized as per the steps by Whittemore and Knafl (2005).

Results: Thirteen tools were evaluated (The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire (BIDQ), Acne-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (Acne-QoL), Skindex, the Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI), the Acne Disability Index (ADI), United Kingdom Sickness Impact Profile (UKSIP), My Skin Questionnaire (MSQ), the Body Self Questionnaire, the Body Esteem Scale, the Self-Esteem Scale, Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI), Pediatric Quality of Life Questionnaire (PedsQL), and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). All Screening tools examined attained high scores of reliability and validity. In diagnosing psychological effects of acne in adolescents the highest percentage found was 50% (5/10) for depression and social isolation, the next highest was at 40% (4/10) for body image 40%, with lowered self-esteem and anxiety in 30% of studies (3/10). Four studies analyzed regarding the effectiveness and benefits of implementing screening tools. Effectiveness was found to be impacted when acted upon immediately of the results with interventions such as referrals and patient education. Noted limitations were that tools were not compared against each other and the lack of a theoretical framework.

Conclusion: Timeliness was regarded as an integral element for optimal conducive psychological interventions of education and referral. This is not clearly delineated in the Lazarus and Folkman Coping Theory model (1984). For the guidance of future intervention studies the researchers of this integrative literature review propose that with symptom distress knowing how the adolescent copes early in the progression versus later is paramount for effectiveness.

Keywords: acne, psychological effects, adolescents, interventions, detect, manage

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Mar 22nd, 10:00 AM Mar 22nd, 11:30 AM

Interventions to Detect and Manage the Psychological Effects in Adolescents Suffering from Acne: An Integrative Literature Review

Interventions to Detect and Manage the Psychological Effects in Adolescents Suffering from Acne: An Integrative Literature Review

Jimmie Fitzhugh and Rodne Serapio

Research Sponsor: Elizabeth P Anderson RN, PhD

Background: Acne is a chronic skin disorder that often presents in adolescents. The psychological effects that present with acne have been well researched and established. However, the interventions available to detect psychological effects, as well as their effectiveness and benefits, have not been organized or discussed.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to explore the screening tools that exist to detect and manage the psychological effects present in adolescents suffering from acne.

Methods: An integrative literature review was completed on ten research studies from 1996 to 2017. The final 10 eligible papers after searches, exclusion criteria were: 1 from Pubmed, 3 from Academic Search Complete, 4 from CINAHL, and 2 from PsychInfo. A Shimpuku and Norr (2012) diagram was used to assist in visualization of the results. Data analysis was utilized as per the steps by Whittemore and Knafl (2005).

Results: Thirteen tools were evaluated (The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire (BIDQ), Acne-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (Acne-QoL), Skindex, the Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI), the Acne Disability Index (ADI), United Kingdom Sickness Impact Profile (UKSIP), My Skin Questionnaire (MSQ), the Body Self Questionnaire, the Body Esteem Scale, the Self-Esteem Scale, Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI), Pediatric Quality of Life Questionnaire (PedsQL), and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). All Screening tools examined attained high scores of reliability and validity. In diagnosing psychological effects of acne in adolescents the highest percentage found was 50% (5/10) for depression and social isolation, the next highest was at 40% (4/10) for body image 40%, with lowered self-esteem and anxiety in 30% of studies (3/10). Four studies analyzed regarding the effectiveness and benefits of implementing screening tools. Effectiveness was found to be impacted when acted upon immediately of the results with interventions such as referrals and patient education. Noted limitations were that tools were not compared against each other and the lack of a theoretical framework.

Conclusion: Timeliness was regarded as an integral element for optimal conducive psychological interventions of education and referral. This is not clearly delineated in the Lazarus and Folkman Coping Theory model (1984). For the guidance of future intervention studies the researchers of this integrative literature review propose that with symptom distress knowing how the adolescent copes early in the progression versus later is paramount for effectiveness.

Keywords: acne, psychological effects, adolescents, interventions, detect, manage