Start Date

22-3-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-3-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Effect of Equine-Assisted Therapy (Hippotherapy) on Gross motor, Postural Control and Performance Outcomes of Children with Cognitive and Developmental Disabilities

Paule Nguendang

Research sponsor: Michelle Neuman MA, MSN, RN, PPCNP-BC

Background: Hippotherapy, which is a subset of Equine-assisted therapy, is defined as a use of horses as a therapeutic intervention for treatment of physical and psychosocial rehabilitation in children with development, cognitive and intellectual disabilities. This therapy has been used for many years to access or evaluate the treatment benefit horses have on children and adult with similar disabilities.

Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore existing literature focusing on the effectiveness of equine-assisted therapy (EAT, also called hippotherapy) on gross motor, postural control and performance outcomes in children with cognitive and developmental disabilities.

Methods: An integrative literature review was conducted using Whittemore & Knafl’s (2005) framework. It was also guided by the conceptual framework of Dorothy Johnson’s Behavioral System Model. Nine articles were selected and critically analyzed. The information from these articles was generated and placed in a data matrix.

Results: The result of these articles revealed that after weeks of intervention, there were no significant differences in both the control and the treatment group, but the hippotherapy group had a significantly greater improvement in some dimension than the control group (p < 0.05). The common limitations highlighted by these articles are: lack of theoretical framework, sample size, the program length and the lack of accurately representing the participant group being studied. Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM – 66/88) was the common tool utilized which evaluates child capacity on gross motor especially on children with cerebral palsy.

Conclusion: Although the use of hippotherapy was proven to be effective, further studies are warranted to ameliorate previously completed studies for better, reliable and generalized data. The nine articles addressed the population with different range of disabilities. In the population with CP, improvement was mostly perceived in sitting balance and motor control; those with Autism Spectrum Disorder showed an improvement in their social functioning and those with intellectual disabilities showed an improvement in the gait and during walking. Overall, a clear understanding of how this therapy works and how it helps during these movements is not well understood. This intervention shows promise as an innovative response in clinical rehabilitation.

Keywords: Hippotherapy, cognitive and developmental disabilities, EAT, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism, ADHD, intellectual disabilities

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Mar 22nd, 10:00 AM Mar 22nd, 11:00 AM

Effect of Equine-Assisted Therapy (Hippotherapy) on Gross motor, Postural Control and Performance Outcomes of Children with Cognitive and Developmental Disabilities

Effect of Equine-Assisted Therapy (Hippotherapy) on Gross motor, Postural Control and Performance Outcomes of Children with Cognitive and Developmental Disabilities

Paule Nguendang

Research sponsor: Michelle Neuman MA, MSN, RN, PPCNP-BC

Background: Hippotherapy, which is a subset of Equine-assisted therapy, is defined as a use of horses as a therapeutic intervention for treatment of physical and psychosocial rehabilitation in children with development, cognitive and intellectual disabilities. This therapy has been used for many years to access or evaluate the treatment benefit horses have on children and adult with similar disabilities.

Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore existing literature focusing on the effectiveness of equine-assisted therapy (EAT, also called hippotherapy) on gross motor, postural control and performance outcomes in children with cognitive and developmental disabilities.

Methods: An integrative literature review was conducted using Whittemore & Knafl’s (2005) framework. It was also guided by the conceptual framework of Dorothy Johnson’s Behavioral System Model. Nine articles were selected and critically analyzed. The information from these articles was generated and placed in a data matrix.

Results: The result of these articles revealed that after weeks of intervention, there were no significant differences in both the control and the treatment group, but the hippotherapy group had a significantly greater improvement in some dimension than the control group (p < 0.05). The common limitations highlighted by these articles are: lack of theoretical framework, sample size, the program length and the lack of accurately representing the participant group being studied. Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM – 66/88) was the common tool utilized which evaluates child capacity on gross motor especially on children with cerebral palsy.

Conclusion: Although the use of hippotherapy was proven to be effective, further studies are warranted to ameliorate previously completed studies for better, reliable and generalized data. The nine articles addressed the population with different range of disabilities. In the population with CP, improvement was mostly perceived in sitting balance and motor control; those with Autism Spectrum Disorder showed an improvement in their social functioning and those with intellectual disabilities showed an improvement in the gait and during walking. Overall, a clear understanding of how this therapy works and how it helps during these movements is not well understood. This intervention shows promise as an innovative response in clinical rehabilitation.

Keywords: Hippotherapy, cognitive and developmental disabilities, EAT, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism, ADHD, intellectual disabilities