Presenter Information

Britney SandinoFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 12:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 PM

Description

Background: Adolescent obesity and diabetes increase the risk of numerous physiological health threats and psychosocial stress disorders. Educating this population on how to cope with physical and psychosocial stressors improves their health status and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Objectives: The purpose of this review was to provide the nursing community with insight on the health promotion effects of fostering psychosocial resilience in diabetic adolescents aged 7 to 17 and suggest specific methods to integrate into their plan of care.

Methods: An integrative literature review was performed using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature, Ovid Medline, ProQuest and Cochrane databases to gather articles from the past ten years focused on the benefit of applying the psychoneuroimmunology theory to adolescents with diabetes.

Results: Obesity in adolescents correlated with higher incidences of diabetes. Both obesity and diabetes promote a myriad of stressful conditions inciting suboptimal glycemic control and non-adherence to treatment regimens such as diet, medications and exercise. The psycho-neuro-immunological theory recognizes the potential benefits of stress reduction techniques as a method to promote health and longevity in this particular population.

Conclusions: Resilience to psychosocial stressors positively affects the HRQOL of adolescent patients with diabetes and obesity. Nurses can promote resilience via therapeutic interventions as well as providing encouragement and motivational strategies to manage physical and social stress.

Keywords: adolescent, diabetes, psychoneuroimmunology, patient education, psychological resilience, nursing

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Aug 23rd, 12:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 PM

Effect of Promoting Psychosocial Resilience in Adolescents with Diabetes: An Integrative Literature Review

Background: Adolescent obesity and diabetes increase the risk of numerous physiological health threats and psychosocial stress disorders. Educating this population on how to cope with physical and psychosocial stressors improves their health status and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Objectives: The purpose of this review was to provide the nursing community with insight on the health promotion effects of fostering psychosocial resilience in diabetic adolescents aged 7 to 17 and suggest specific methods to integrate into their plan of care.

Methods: An integrative literature review was performed using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature, Ovid Medline, ProQuest and Cochrane databases to gather articles from the past ten years focused on the benefit of applying the psychoneuroimmunology theory to adolescents with diabetes.

Results: Obesity in adolescents correlated with higher incidences of diabetes. Both obesity and diabetes promote a myriad of stressful conditions inciting suboptimal glycemic control and non-adherence to treatment regimens such as diet, medications and exercise. The psycho-neuro-immunological theory recognizes the potential benefits of stress reduction techniques as a method to promote health and longevity in this particular population.

Conclusions: Resilience to psychosocial stressors positively affects the HRQOL of adolescent patients with diabetes and obesity. Nurses can promote resilience via therapeutic interventions as well as providing encouragement and motivational strategies to manage physical and social stress.

Keywords: adolescent, diabetes, psychoneuroimmunology, patient education, psychological resilience, nursing

 

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