Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Several studies suggest nurses specializing in women’s health, pediatrics, and family health have a critical role quickly identifying and subsequently, treating postpartum depression. Due to lack of knowledge surrounding postpartum depression and differences among assessments, it is estimated that almost half of postpartum depression cases go undiagnosed and untreated.

Objectives: To explore what research has been conducted regarding the clinical outcomes associated with effective screening of postpartum patients, to recommend educational programs for staff and patients, and screening and treatment protocols development so screening for postpartum depression can becomes universal.

Methods: This integrative literature review was conducted using keywords “postpartum depression, nursing, screening, and treatment” to search the literature between 2007 and 2018. Articles were all in English and used data bases PubMed, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete. A total of eight articles were used.

Results: The studies show that there are many types of postpartum depression screening; there is a general acceptability of screening/treatment by women and providers; and there are common factors that affect screening/treatment.

Conclusions: This review found that nurses, because of their repeated contact with postpartum women, are well positioned to provide depression screening and counseling. Nurse-delivered mental health care has the great potential to remove many barriers that have prevented the detection and treatment of postpartum depression, and therefore, improve outcomes for women, and their children.

Key words: postpartum depression, nursing, screening, and treatment

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM

Effective Screening of Postpartum Depression and its Potential to Increase Treatment: An Integrative Literature Review

Abstract

Background: Several studies suggest nurses specializing in women’s health, pediatrics, and family health have a critical role quickly identifying and subsequently, treating postpartum depression. Due to lack of knowledge surrounding postpartum depression and differences among assessments, it is estimated that almost half of postpartum depression cases go undiagnosed and untreated.

Objectives: To explore what research has been conducted regarding the clinical outcomes associated with effective screening of postpartum patients, to recommend educational programs for staff and patients, and screening and treatment protocols development so screening for postpartum depression can becomes universal.

Methods: This integrative literature review was conducted using keywords “postpartum depression, nursing, screening, and treatment” to search the literature between 2007 and 2018. Articles were all in English and used data bases PubMed, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete. A total of eight articles were used.

Results: The studies show that there are many types of postpartum depression screening; there is a general acceptability of screening/treatment by women and providers; and there are common factors that affect screening/treatment.

Conclusions: This review found that nurses, because of their repeated contact with postpartum women, are well positioned to provide depression screening and counseling. Nurse-delivered mental health care has the great potential to remove many barriers that have prevented the detection and treatment of postpartum depression, and therefore, improve outcomes for women, and their children.

Key words: postpartum depression, nursing, screening, and treatment

 

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