Presenter Information

Kara JamisonFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Heart disease is the number one killer for all Americans along with stroke and, as it stands, the risks of getting those diseases are even higher for African-Americans in comparison to other groups.

Objectives: The purpose of this literature review is to assess the association between chronic stressors, including racial and socioeconomical stressors, and disproportionate development of cardiovascular disease in the African American community through the use of research databases.

Method: A systematic literature review was conducted using CINAHL, PsycInfo and Academic Search Complete database. A search was conducted using these terms: African American, blacks, heart disease, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, heart failure, vascular diseases, race, racial, ethnic, ethnicity, genetic, interGEN, and disparities.

Results: Through the use of surveys, interviews, home visits, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure measurements, researchers were able to look at the relationship between chronic stressors and the development of hypertension (HTN) amongst black participants. Researchers found an inverse relationship between socioeconomical status and HTN specifically amongst women. The studies also showed the presence of racism-related vigilance, or anticipatory stress, had a positive association with HTN among Blacks meaning that a 1-point increase in vigilance yielded a 4% increase in the odds of HTN. When looking at the youth, an increase in internalized racial stress was associated with an increase in BMI. An increase in internalized racism was also positively associated with an increase in the average diastolic blood pressure compared to those who scored moderately on individual racial stress.

Conclusion: In order to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities, professionals must acknowledge that race and racism factor into healthcare. Less directed efforts to improve health outcomes, ones that fail to consider particular stressors that explicitly affect Blacks, Hispanics, or other patients of color may not only lead to unequal gains across groups but could also exacerbate racial health disparities.

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 AM

The Effects of Stress in the Black Community and Cardiovascular Diseases in Relation to Other Groups

Abstract

Background: Heart disease is the number one killer for all Americans along with stroke and, as it stands, the risks of getting those diseases are even higher for African-Americans in comparison to other groups.

Objectives: The purpose of this literature review is to assess the association between chronic stressors, including racial and socioeconomical stressors, and disproportionate development of cardiovascular disease in the African American community through the use of research databases.

Method: A systematic literature review was conducted using CINAHL, PsycInfo and Academic Search Complete database. A search was conducted using these terms: African American, blacks, heart disease, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, heart failure, vascular diseases, race, racial, ethnic, ethnicity, genetic, interGEN, and disparities.

Results: Through the use of surveys, interviews, home visits, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure measurements, researchers were able to look at the relationship between chronic stressors and the development of hypertension (HTN) amongst black participants. Researchers found an inverse relationship between socioeconomical status and HTN specifically amongst women. The studies also showed the presence of racism-related vigilance, or anticipatory stress, had a positive association with HTN among Blacks meaning that a 1-point increase in vigilance yielded a 4% increase in the odds of HTN. When looking at the youth, an increase in internalized racial stress was associated with an increase in BMI. An increase in internalized racism was also positively associated with an increase in the average diastolic blood pressure compared to those who scored moderately on individual racial stress.

Conclusion: In order to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities, professionals must acknowledge that race and racism factor into healthcare. Less directed efforts to improve health outcomes, ones that fail to consider particular stressors that explicitly affect Blacks, Hispanics, or other patients of color may not only lead to unequal gains across groups but could also exacerbate racial health disparities.