Presenter Information

Tara WinkelmannFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Background: Postpartum depression is a major depressive disorder that can occur anytime during pregnancy and for up to a few weeks after giving birth. Postpartum depression affects a significant proportion of women who have given birth, regardless of the birth outcomes. Mothers who had their babies admitted into the NICU face a different postpartum experience than mothers who had healthy babies, which increases their risk for developing postpartum depression.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine if women whose babies were admitted to the NICU were at a higher risk for developing postpartum depression, and how depression screenings and treatments could be improved for this population.

Method: This study was designed as an integrated literature review and was conducted using CINAHL, UpToDate, and Nursing & Allied Health Databased (Proquest) databases. A search was completed using the terms “postpartum depression,” “postpartum mood disorders,” “mothers in the NICU,” “Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU),” and “Maternal Role Attainment Theory (MRAT).”

Results: Mothers who had babies admitted to the NICU were determined to have higher rates of postpartum depression. Having a sick infant in the hospital altered the mother’s attainment of the maternal role. With the change in this process, women are at a higher likelihood of developing postpartum mood disorders. Women with babies in the NICU also tend to forego important self-care in lieu of their baby’s unexpected need for specialized care. Depressed mothers are less likely to respond to their infant’s cues and have less positive interactions with their baby. It was determined that there were more positive results when NICU nurses conducted depression screenings and treatment referrals for these mothers.

Conclusion: Since depression screenings were successful when done by NICU nurses, efforts should be put into place for training more NICU nurses on how to properly screen these mothers for postpartum depression. These nurses may also help facilitate the mothers’ transitions into the maternal role to promote more positive outcomes for the mothers.

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 AM

Postpartum Depression in Women Whose Babies Were Admitted to the NICU: An Integrative Literature Review

Background: Postpartum depression is a major depressive disorder that can occur anytime during pregnancy and for up to a few weeks after giving birth. Postpartum depression affects a significant proportion of women who have given birth, regardless of the birth outcomes. Mothers who had their babies admitted into the NICU face a different postpartum experience than mothers who had healthy babies, which increases their risk for developing postpartum depression.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine if women whose babies were admitted to the NICU were at a higher risk for developing postpartum depression, and how depression screenings and treatments could be improved for this population.

Method: This study was designed as an integrated literature review and was conducted using CINAHL, UpToDate, and Nursing & Allied Health Databased (Proquest) databases. A search was completed using the terms “postpartum depression,” “postpartum mood disorders,” “mothers in the NICU,” “Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU),” and “Maternal Role Attainment Theory (MRAT).”

Results: Mothers who had babies admitted to the NICU were determined to have higher rates of postpartum depression. Having a sick infant in the hospital altered the mother’s attainment of the maternal role. With the change in this process, women are at a higher likelihood of developing postpartum mood disorders. Women with babies in the NICU also tend to forego important self-care in lieu of their baby’s unexpected need for specialized care. Depressed mothers are less likely to respond to their infant’s cues and have less positive interactions with their baby. It was determined that there were more positive results when NICU nurses conducted depression screenings and treatment referrals for these mothers.

Conclusion: Since depression screenings were successful when done by NICU nurses, efforts should be put into place for training more NICU nurses on how to properly screen these mothers for postpartum depression. These nurses may also help facilitate the mothers’ transitions into the maternal role to promote more positive outcomes for the mothers.