Presenter Information

Daisy Lopez ArroyoFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Abstract

Help-Seeking Barriers Amongst Hispanic Women with Postpartum Depression

Background: Postpartum depression (PPD), although dangerous for the mother and the child, is not often acknowledged by the Hispanic community. Due to this, there is a limited amount of research investigating the impact of PPD in Hispanic women. However, considering the detrimental effects of PPD on women, it is important to analyze the barriers that impede Hispanic women from seeking professional medical attention for their symptoms. This is especially true considering that the Hispanic population are the largest minority group in the United States and are accounting for a large portion of national births in the U.S. More research is needed regarding the help-seeking barriers among the Hispanic community struggling with PPD and treatment preferences.

Objective: The Purpose of this integrative literature review is to (a) explore and identify the help-seeking barriers in Hispanic women with PPD or PPD symptoms and (b) recommend culturally specific interventions and strategies to treat and prevent PPD in Hispanic women.

Method: This study used an integrative literature review to analyze the research conducted on the cultural beliefs, perceptions, and values of PPD in Hispanic women; in order to identify what help-seeking barriers exist in Hispanic women with PPD, and to corroborate a more culturally appropriate intervention based in the barriers found in research. Stern and Kruckman’s theoretical framework was used as an aid to understand why such barriers exist within the Hispanic population.

Results: Based on the research, the common trend that was found was that all help-seeking barrier could be categorized into three subtopics: (a) personal barriers, (b) social barriers, and (c) healthcare/financial barriers.

Discussion: Research suggest that the main barriers to help-seeking among Hispanic women are categorized as personal, social, and healthcare/financial barriers. Although the barriers are discussed in the literature, there is an overall lack of researcher on culturally appropriate interventions. Researchers have proposed that Hispanic women prefer their treatment to follow a hierarchy. The first step would be via their own coping mechanisms, followed by social support; such as a home visiting nurse, and ending with behavioral therapy. Antidepressants were agreed to be used as a last resort for severe PPD. In particular, for cases where no other form of treatment was successful. Regardless of the plan of care, it is important for information regarding PPD be in the patient’s native language. Providing information to a patient would be considered useless if they do not understand what is being given to them. Due to this, all information provided, both verbally and in writing, should be done so in Spanish.

Key words: postpartum depression, Latinas, Latinos, Hispanics, beliefs, values, attitudes, and knowledge.

Included in

Nursing Commons

Share

COinS
 
Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 AM

Help-Seeking Barriers Amongst Hispanic Women with Postpartum Depression

Abstract

Help-Seeking Barriers Amongst Hispanic Women with Postpartum Depression

Background: Postpartum depression (PPD), although dangerous for the mother and the child, is not often acknowledged by the Hispanic community. Due to this, there is a limited amount of research investigating the impact of PPD in Hispanic women. However, considering the detrimental effects of PPD on women, it is important to analyze the barriers that impede Hispanic women from seeking professional medical attention for their symptoms. This is especially true considering that the Hispanic population are the largest minority group in the United States and are accounting for a large portion of national births in the U.S. More research is needed regarding the help-seeking barriers among the Hispanic community struggling with PPD and treatment preferences.

Objective: The Purpose of this integrative literature review is to (a) explore and identify the help-seeking barriers in Hispanic women with PPD or PPD symptoms and (b) recommend culturally specific interventions and strategies to treat and prevent PPD in Hispanic women.

Method: This study used an integrative literature review to analyze the research conducted on the cultural beliefs, perceptions, and values of PPD in Hispanic women; in order to identify what help-seeking barriers exist in Hispanic women with PPD, and to corroborate a more culturally appropriate intervention based in the barriers found in research. Stern and Kruckman’s theoretical framework was used as an aid to understand why such barriers exist within the Hispanic population.

Results: Based on the research, the common trend that was found was that all help-seeking barrier could be categorized into three subtopics: (a) personal barriers, (b) social barriers, and (c) healthcare/financial barriers.

Discussion: Research suggest that the main barriers to help-seeking among Hispanic women are categorized as personal, social, and healthcare/financial barriers. Although the barriers are discussed in the literature, there is an overall lack of researcher on culturally appropriate interventions. Researchers have proposed that Hispanic women prefer their treatment to follow a hierarchy. The first step would be via their own coping mechanisms, followed by social support; such as a home visiting nurse, and ending with behavioral therapy. Antidepressants were agreed to be used as a last resort for severe PPD. In particular, for cases where no other form of treatment was successful. Regardless of the plan of care, it is important for information regarding PPD be in the patient’s native language. Providing information to a patient would be considered useless if they do not understand what is being given to them. Due to this, all information provided, both verbally and in writing, should be done so in Spanish.

Key words: postpartum depression, Latinas, Latinos, Hispanics, beliefs, values, attitudes, and knowledge.