Presenter Information

Lauren BuszydloFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Abstract:

Background: We live in an era of increased efforts aimed at preventing healthcare-

associated infections. Hospitals create specific guidelines when discussing hand-

hygiene, particular protocols for catheter-associated infections or surgical site

infections; however, stethoscope cleaning is very rarely brought into the conversation

(Ghumman et al., 2018). Only about 3.9% of healthcare workers are cleaning their

stethoscopes after every patient contact and only 9.7% are cleaning it at least once

daily (Walsh, 2013). With these alarming numbers stated about healthcare providers

and stethoscope disinfection, the potential contamination and pathogen transmission

by stethoscopes has been noticed as a potential source of hospital acquired

infections.

Objectives: Clearer guidelines must be implemented to all healthcare workers about

the necessity and frequency of cleaning their stethoscopes. Findings indicate that

HCPs generally do understand the need to clean stethoscopes, but current cleaning

behaviors are not sufficient (Ali et al., 2016). Experimental research was done to

determine what the most effective way for HCPs to clean their stethoscopes is after

each patient use and what frequency and technique is most appropriate. These

findings were analyzed to determine if a higher frequency of disinfecting stethoscopes

daily would be related to decreasing the amount of hospital infection rates.

Method: The design for this study was an integrative review of literature aimed at

discovering the current practice of physicians, nurses and all healthcare providers in

stethoscope disinfection.

Results: The need to increase education is definitely necessary and CDC guidelines

remain unclear on the frequency of stethoscope cleaning. There is less healthcare

consensus regarding the optimal frequency of stethoscope cleaning, or what the most

effective disinfectants might be (Ghumman et al., 2018).

Conclusion: Hospitals should be including stethoscope cleaning and awareness into

their overall infection prevention efforts.

Key words: stethoscope, infection, hospital-acquired infections, healthcare providers,

disinfection, disinfection rates, contamination, CDC, nosocomial infections, HCAIs.

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 AM

Stethoscope Disinfection Rates on the Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Infections

Abstract:

Background: We live in an era of increased efforts aimed at preventing healthcare-

associated infections. Hospitals create specific guidelines when discussing hand-

hygiene, particular protocols for catheter-associated infections or surgical site

infections; however, stethoscope cleaning is very rarely brought into the conversation

(Ghumman et al., 2018). Only about 3.9% of healthcare workers are cleaning their

stethoscopes after every patient contact and only 9.7% are cleaning it at least once

daily (Walsh, 2013). With these alarming numbers stated about healthcare providers

and stethoscope disinfection, the potential contamination and pathogen transmission

by stethoscopes has been noticed as a potential source of hospital acquired

infections.

Objectives: Clearer guidelines must be implemented to all healthcare workers about

the necessity and frequency of cleaning their stethoscopes. Findings indicate that

HCPs generally do understand the need to clean stethoscopes, but current cleaning

behaviors are not sufficient (Ali et al., 2016). Experimental research was done to

determine what the most effective way for HCPs to clean their stethoscopes is after

each patient use and what frequency and technique is most appropriate. These

findings were analyzed to determine if a higher frequency of disinfecting stethoscopes

daily would be related to decreasing the amount of hospital infection rates.

Method: The design for this study was an integrative review of literature aimed at

discovering the current practice of physicians, nurses and all healthcare providers in

stethoscope disinfection.

Results: The need to increase education is definitely necessary and CDC guidelines

remain unclear on the frequency of stethoscope cleaning. There is less healthcare

consensus regarding the optimal frequency of stethoscope cleaning, or what the most

effective disinfectants might be (Ghumman et al., 2018).

Conclusion: Hospitals should be including stethoscope cleaning and awareness into

their overall infection prevention efforts.

Key words: stethoscope, infection, hospital-acquired infections, healthcare providers,

disinfection, disinfection rates, contamination, CDC, nosocomial infections, HCAIs.

 

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