Presenter Information

Nhu DoFollow

Start Date

23-8-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-8-2019 11:00 AM

Description

Background:

The experiences of refugees are often characterized by traumatic stressors including loss and violence. Minors of these target populations are particularly sensitive to traumatic stress due to the nature of their developmental state. Currently, there is a lack of evidence-based research on the efficacy of Creative Arts Therapies (CATs) as interventions to reduce traumatic stress symptoms of refugee minors.

Study Purpose:

The purpose of this integrative literature review is to evaluate the current research to determine the efficacy of CATs as therapeutic interventions for refugee minors by comparing their traumatic stress symptoms before and after participating in CATs interventions.

Method:

An integrative literature review was utilized to answer the main research question. This review provided a comprehensive summary of the literature and its findings. The literature search with exclusion and inclusion criteria applied resulted in a total of six studies selected for review.

Results:

Three major themes highlighting the benefits of cats were identified in this study. These themes included: social engagement and connection; self-esteem and self-efficacy; and coping and relaxation. Additionally, the empirical evidence from four of the six studies indicated the decrease in traumatic stress symptoms including maladaptive grief, depression, and anxiety to be statistically significant post-CATs interventions. Significance determined by p-values for the two other studies weren’t established. However, the results still suggest the potential benefits that couldn’t be measured from a deficit-based approach.

Conclusion:

CATs have been indicated as possible early interventions for refugee minors who undergo traumatic forced migration. Three major themes that relates to the positive growth and development of refugee children during CATs interventions were identified. The empirical findings also resulted towards positive and protective effects of CATs when measuring its efficacy. More research is required to establish the benefits of CATs as culturally and contextually relevant interventions for a growing vulnerable population.

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Aug 23rd, 9:00 AM Aug 23rd, 11:00 AM

The Effects of Creative Arts Therapies on the Traumatic Stress Symptoms of Refugee Minors

Background:

The experiences of refugees are often characterized by traumatic stressors including loss and violence. Minors of these target populations are particularly sensitive to traumatic stress due to the nature of their developmental state. Currently, there is a lack of evidence-based research on the efficacy of Creative Arts Therapies (CATs) as interventions to reduce traumatic stress symptoms of refugee minors.

Study Purpose:

The purpose of this integrative literature review is to evaluate the current research to determine the efficacy of CATs as therapeutic interventions for refugee minors by comparing their traumatic stress symptoms before and after participating in CATs interventions.

Method:

An integrative literature review was utilized to answer the main research question. This review provided a comprehensive summary of the literature and its findings. The literature search with exclusion and inclusion criteria applied resulted in a total of six studies selected for review.

Results:

Three major themes highlighting the benefits of cats were identified in this study. These themes included: social engagement and connection; self-esteem and self-efficacy; and coping and relaxation. Additionally, the empirical evidence from four of the six studies indicated the decrease in traumatic stress symptoms including maladaptive grief, depression, and anxiety to be statistically significant post-CATs interventions. Significance determined by p-values for the two other studies weren’t established. However, the results still suggest the potential benefits that couldn’t be measured from a deficit-based approach.

Conclusion:

CATs have been indicated as possible early interventions for refugee minors who undergo traumatic forced migration. Three major themes that relates to the positive growth and development of refugee children during CATs interventions were identified. The empirical findings also resulted towards positive and protective effects of CATs when measuring its efficacy. More research is required to establish the benefits of CATs as culturally and contextually relevant interventions for a growing vulnerable population.

 

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