Presenter Information

Lauren WilsFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

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ABSTRACT

Background: Although rates of cervical cancer have greatly decreased since the development of the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear in the 1950s and more recently, the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Hispanic women suffer from disproportionately higher incidence and mortality rates than any other ethnic/minority group. At 9.4 women per 100,000 cases, cervical cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer death among Hispanic women due to screening disparities.

Objectives: This study aimed to identify cultural and social barriers to cervical cancer screening specific to the Hispanic population that are often overlooked in classic research on healthcare disparities.

Methods: Driven by psychosocial theory on health behaviors, this integrative literature review identified psychosocial and sociocultural barriers and successful intervention strategies exclusive to Hispanics in the U.S. through database searches conducted in CINHAL, PsycINFO and PubMed from 2007 to 2018.

Results: Four interconnected themes were identified through a review of 25 articles: stigma of sexual promiscuity and religiosity, fear/embarrassment, mistrust of providers and familial/male influence. Proven interventions focused on including community outreach, implementing a positive social network and using mixed-media.

Conclusion: There is a lack of research on understanding complex social relationships and cultural practices that influence health behaviors among the Hispanic population in the U.S. Intervention strategies should be geared towards overcoming the identified barriers, as well as expanding the cultural competencies of nurses.

Key words: Hispanics, cervical cancer, pap smear, HPV, psychosocial, sociocultural, barriers, adherence and intervention.

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Aug 17th, 10:00 AM

Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening Among Hispanic Women

ABSTRACT

Background: Although rates of cervical cancer have greatly decreased since the development of the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear in the 1950s and more recently, the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Hispanic women suffer from disproportionately higher incidence and mortality rates than any other ethnic/minority group. At 9.4 women per 100,000 cases, cervical cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer death among Hispanic women due to screening disparities.

Objectives: This study aimed to identify cultural and social barriers to cervical cancer screening specific to the Hispanic population that are often overlooked in classic research on healthcare disparities.

Methods: Driven by psychosocial theory on health behaviors, this integrative literature review identified psychosocial and sociocultural barriers and successful intervention strategies exclusive to Hispanics in the U.S. through database searches conducted in CINHAL, PsycINFO and PubMed from 2007 to 2018.

Results: Four interconnected themes were identified through a review of 25 articles: stigma of sexual promiscuity and religiosity, fear/embarrassment, mistrust of providers and familial/male influence. Proven interventions focused on including community outreach, implementing a positive social network and using mixed-media.

Conclusion: There is a lack of research on understanding complex social relationships and cultural practices that influence health behaviors among the Hispanic population in the U.S. Intervention strategies should be geared towards overcoming the identified barriers, as well as expanding the cultural competencies of nurses.

Key words: Hispanics, cervical cancer, pap smear, HPV, psychosocial, sociocultural, barriers, adherence and intervention.