Presenter Information

Clare KefferFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-8-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Background: Pregnant teens and their infants are exceptionally vulnerable to adverse birth outcomes. The most reliable way to reduce the incidence of these negative outcomes is to receive early and adequate prenatal care. There are a number of factors that prevent pregnant teens from receiving or even seeking prenatal care, including limited access, a lack of social support, and stigmas or biases held by cultures or even health care providers.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to explore factors preventing pregnant teenagers from receiving early and adequate prenatal care, and the consequences they may encounter without receiving prenatal care. Additionally, this integrative literature review seeks to explore how to overcome said barriers and improve birth outcomes by examining what programs and interventions have been successfully implemented to address these factors.

Method: An integrative literature review was compiled by using three databases: PsycInfo, CINAHL Complete, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The keywords used were “prenatal care AND teen*” to find literature addressing the research question, which asks what factors contribute to pregnant teenagers not receiving early and adequate prenatal care.

Results: Among the 15 articles reviewed, the four major factors found that prevent teens from early and adequate prenatal care were identified as: (1) inconvenience, (2) structure of care not being tailored to adolescents, (3) lack of social support, and (4) unpreparedness or lack of motivation to become a mother.

Conclusion: This integrative literature review examines the barriers to receiving adequate prenatal care by pregnant adolescents, although further research is necessary to understand how to effectively and practically address these barriers and to evaluate the outcomes of intervention programs.

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Aug 17th, 10:00 AM Aug 17th, 11:30 AM

Factors Preventing Pregnant Teens from Early and Adequate Prenatal Care: An Integrative Literature Review

Background: Pregnant teens and their infants are exceptionally vulnerable to adverse birth outcomes. The most reliable way to reduce the incidence of these negative outcomes is to receive early and adequate prenatal care. There are a number of factors that prevent pregnant teens from receiving or even seeking prenatal care, including limited access, a lack of social support, and stigmas or biases held by cultures or even health care providers.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to explore factors preventing pregnant teenagers from receiving early and adequate prenatal care, and the consequences they may encounter without receiving prenatal care. Additionally, this integrative literature review seeks to explore how to overcome said barriers and improve birth outcomes by examining what programs and interventions have been successfully implemented to address these factors.

Method: An integrative literature review was compiled by using three databases: PsycInfo, CINAHL Complete, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The keywords used were “prenatal care AND teen*” to find literature addressing the research question, which asks what factors contribute to pregnant teenagers not receiving early and adequate prenatal care.

Results: Among the 15 articles reviewed, the four major factors found that prevent teens from early and adequate prenatal care were identified as: (1) inconvenience, (2) structure of care not being tailored to adolescents, (3) lack of social support, and (4) unpreparedness or lack of motivation to become a mother.

Conclusion: This integrative literature review examines the barriers to receiving adequate prenatal care by pregnant adolescents, although further research is necessary to understand how to effectively and practically address these barriers and to evaluate the outcomes of intervention programs.