Presenter Information

Lauren KingFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-8-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background:Previous studies have consistently reported that African Americans living in economically disadvantaged communities are less likely to adhere to treatment recommendations for chronic diseases compared to other racial groups. Despite this fact, there have been limited attempts to compile and synthesize factors contributing to the lack of treatment adherence or the efforts being made to promote it.

Objectives:To explore the factors that attribute to the high rates of non-adherence to treatments for chronic diseases amongst the low socioeconomic African American community, and to determine the best approach to promoting adherence within this community.

Methods: This review of literature consisted of a computerized search was conducted using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, and the Cochran Library database. Literature reviews, academic journals, and case reports published within the last 10 years were analyzed and evaluated to address each of the research questions proposed in the study

Results: Four factors were found to contribute to the nonadherence rates amongst low income African Americans:1)personal perception and beliefs, 2) expectation of care, 3) financial state, and 4) patient education. The efforts can be made to promote treatment adherence for chronic diseases included adequate patient education, improved relationships Between patient and provider, and cost effectiveness.

Conclusion: This study found that personal perception and beliefs, expectation of care, financial state, and patient education, all had a significant impact on the declining rates of treatment adherence amongst African Americans. Taking these into account, coupled with culturally competent care could greatly improve the overall health of this vulnerable population as well as treatment compliance.

Keywords: adherence, compliance, medication, treatment, African American, black, poor, low socioeconomic, poverty, chronic disease, medication, and treatment.

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Aug 17th, 10:00 AM Aug 17th, 11:30 AM

Contributing Factors to the Lack of Treatment Adherence for Chronic Diseases Among Low-Income African Americans: Integrative Literature Review

Abstract

Background:Previous studies have consistently reported that African Americans living in economically disadvantaged communities are less likely to adhere to treatment recommendations for chronic diseases compared to other racial groups. Despite this fact, there have been limited attempts to compile and synthesize factors contributing to the lack of treatment adherence or the efforts being made to promote it.

Objectives:To explore the factors that attribute to the high rates of non-adherence to treatments for chronic diseases amongst the low socioeconomic African American community, and to determine the best approach to promoting adherence within this community.

Methods: This review of literature consisted of a computerized search was conducted using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, and the Cochran Library database. Literature reviews, academic journals, and case reports published within the last 10 years were analyzed and evaluated to address each of the research questions proposed in the study

Results: Four factors were found to contribute to the nonadherence rates amongst low income African Americans:1)personal perception and beliefs, 2) expectation of care, 3) financial state, and 4) patient education. The efforts can be made to promote treatment adherence for chronic diseases included adequate patient education, improved relationships Between patient and provider, and cost effectiveness.

Conclusion: This study found that personal perception and beliefs, expectation of care, financial state, and patient education, all had a significant impact on the declining rates of treatment adherence amongst African Americans. Taking these into account, coupled with culturally competent care could greatly improve the overall health of this vulnerable population as well as treatment compliance.

Keywords: adherence, compliance, medication, treatment, African American, black, poor, low socioeconomic, poverty, chronic disease, medication, and treatment.