Presenter Information

Tibil Felix, DePaul UniversityFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-8-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Background: While many healthcare providers are currently looking for alternative methods such as exercise to treat depression, there are limited studies to report how exercise effects symptoms of depression in adults diagnosed with clinical depression and whether an ideal exercise prescription exists.

Objective: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to evaluate the effect of exercise on adults with clinical depression.

Method: An integrative literature review was used. The tidal model of mental health as proposed by Dr. Phil Barker and Poppy Buchanan-Barker was used as a basis for this review. The keywords “clinical depression, exercise, adults, depression treatments, aerobic exercise, and depression symptoms” were used to search the literature no older than 10 years.

Results: It was found that exercise does have a positive effect on the mental state and symptoms of depression. The study concluded that exercise effects depressive mood in three major ways. Those were by promoting the release of endorphins and other neurotransmitters, by acting as a distraction method, and by improving self-efficacy. Thus, study also found that there is no ideal exercise prescription.

Conclusion: The study concluded that exercise does have a significant impact on the mental state and symptoms of depression. Considering the rise in number of adults diagnosed with clinical depression, exercise as an alternative method, can provide major advantages in treating this psychiatric disorder. However, more studies are recommended to further understand the relationship among exercise and depression.

Key Words: clinical depression, exercise, depression treatments, adults, aerobic exercise, and depression symptoms.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 17th, 10:00 AM Aug 17th, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Exercise on Symptoms of Depression in Adults Diagnosed with Clinical Depression: An Integrative Literature Review

Background: While many healthcare providers are currently looking for alternative methods such as exercise to treat depression, there are limited studies to report how exercise effects symptoms of depression in adults diagnosed with clinical depression and whether an ideal exercise prescription exists.

Objective: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to evaluate the effect of exercise on adults with clinical depression.

Method: An integrative literature review was used. The tidal model of mental health as proposed by Dr. Phil Barker and Poppy Buchanan-Barker was used as a basis for this review. The keywords “clinical depression, exercise, adults, depression treatments, aerobic exercise, and depression symptoms” were used to search the literature no older than 10 years.

Results: It was found that exercise does have a positive effect on the mental state and symptoms of depression. The study concluded that exercise effects depressive mood in three major ways. Those were by promoting the release of endorphins and other neurotransmitters, by acting as a distraction method, and by improving self-efficacy. Thus, study also found that there is no ideal exercise prescription.

Conclusion: The study concluded that exercise does have a significant impact on the mental state and symptoms of depression. Considering the rise in number of adults diagnosed with clinical depression, exercise as an alternative method, can provide major advantages in treating this psychiatric disorder. However, more studies are recommended to further understand the relationship among exercise and depression.

Key Words: clinical depression, exercise, depression treatments, adults, aerobic exercise, and depression symptoms.