Presenter Information

Ignacio Perez JrFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-8-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: A key factor behind the high rates of diabetes among Native Americans living in reservations is the high poverty rate. Though food assistance is provided on reservations to combat poverty and food insecurity, the rates of type II diabetes are still at an alarming high rate. Continuation of the alarming incidence of type II diabetes brings to question the nutritional quality of the food offered by food assistance programs.

Objectives: The purpose of study was to examine food assistance programs utilized by Native Americans to determine if the food quality may have an impact on the risk of developing type II diabetes among Native Americans living on reservations in the United States.

Methods: An integrative literature review was conducted to review literature articles published between 2007 and 2018 using scholarly databases: CINAHL, ProQuest Nursing, and PubMed. Keywords included: Native American, American Indian, diabetes, food assistance, and food assistance programs. The literature review method formed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) was used for data reduction, and data analysis was guided by Tannehill’s model.

Results: Findings indicated three aspects about the food from of food assistance programs in relation to the impact on the risk of developing type II diabetes in Native Americans. Those findings were that the food has low nutritional value, does not significantly alleviate food insecurity, and has become a large part of Native American diets.

Conclusion: This integrative literature review found that the food quality of food assistance programs can indeed have an impact on the risk of developing of type II diabetes in Native Americans living on reservations. There is a visible need for health education and policy changes to achieve consistent access to healthier foods, which in turn can possibly decrease the risk of developing type II diabetes for many individuals living on reservations.

Key words: Native American, American Indian, diabetes, food assistance, food assistance programs.

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Aug 17th, 10:00 AM Aug 17th, 11:30 AM

Food Assistant Programs’ Food Quality and The Risk of Developing Type II Diabetes in Native Americans

Abstract

Background: A key factor behind the high rates of diabetes among Native Americans living in reservations is the high poverty rate. Though food assistance is provided on reservations to combat poverty and food insecurity, the rates of type II diabetes are still at an alarming high rate. Continuation of the alarming incidence of type II diabetes brings to question the nutritional quality of the food offered by food assistance programs.

Objectives: The purpose of study was to examine food assistance programs utilized by Native Americans to determine if the food quality may have an impact on the risk of developing type II diabetes among Native Americans living on reservations in the United States.

Methods: An integrative literature review was conducted to review literature articles published between 2007 and 2018 using scholarly databases: CINAHL, ProQuest Nursing, and PubMed. Keywords included: Native American, American Indian, diabetes, food assistance, and food assistance programs. The literature review method formed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) was used for data reduction, and data analysis was guided by Tannehill’s model.

Results: Findings indicated three aspects about the food from of food assistance programs in relation to the impact on the risk of developing type II diabetes in Native Americans. Those findings were that the food has low nutritional value, does not significantly alleviate food insecurity, and has become a large part of Native American diets.

Conclusion: This integrative literature review found that the food quality of food assistance programs can indeed have an impact on the risk of developing of type II diabetes in Native Americans living on reservations. There is a visible need for health education and policy changes to achieve consistent access to healthier foods, which in turn can possibly decrease the risk of developing type II diabetes for many individuals living on reservations.

Key words: Native American, American Indian, diabetes, food assistance, food assistance programs.

 

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