Presenter Information

Lauren Spain-BondiFollow

Start Date

17-8-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-8-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Complex Effects of Caregiver-Patient Relationships on Patient Self-Care in Heart Failure

Lauren Spain-Bondi

Faculty Advisor: Karen Larimer, PhD, RN

Background: Approximately 6.5 million U.S. adults have heart failure (HF), and the incidence is rising rapidly. HF is a costly disease with a high mortality rate. Despite evidence that patient self-care improves health and reduces hospitalizations, many still do not practice effective self-care. An informal caregiver for a patient with HF is positioned to influence self-care, but little is known about the patient/caregiver dynamic or how it affects self-care.

Objective: This study seeks to synthesize and evaluate the most recent research focused on the dynamic between patients with heart failure, their caregivers, and their participation in self-care behavior.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted by searching the databases of CINAHL, HealthSource, ProQuest, PsycINFO and PubMed using search terms including heart failure, self-care, caregiver, self-efficacy, and confidence.

Results: A total of 16 studies reviewed found factors affecting patient self-care include caregiver support, caregiver mental and emotional health, and quality and congruity of the caregiver-patient relationship. A caregiving partner is positively associated with patient physical activity, but caregivers can also be barriers to self-care by modeling unhealthy behavior. A caregiver’s emotional state can affect a patient’s own self-care behavior. Patients in high-quality relationships have better self-care confidence, and self-care is improved when patients and caregivers agree on how to collaborate in their relationship. Educational interventions targeting caregivers can be effective especially if they also teach communication skills.

Conclusion: Patients with heart failure can gain great benefit from having an informal caregiver, but complex factors in the relationship can positively or negatively affect patient self-care. Further research to better understand patient-caregiver relationship dynamics will help clinicians tailor effective interventions to improve HF self-care adherence.

Keywords: heart failure, self-care, caregiver, self-efficacy, confidence

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Aug 17th, 10:00 AM Aug 17th, 11:30 AM

Complex Effects of Caregiver-Patient Relationships on Patient Self-Care in Heart Failure

Complex Effects of Caregiver-Patient Relationships on Patient Self-Care in Heart Failure

Lauren Spain-Bondi

Faculty Advisor: Karen Larimer, PhD, RN

Background: Approximately 6.5 million U.S. adults have heart failure (HF), and the incidence is rising rapidly. HF is a costly disease with a high mortality rate. Despite evidence that patient self-care improves health and reduces hospitalizations, many still do not practice effective self-care. An informal caregiver for a patient with HF is positioned to influence self-care, but little is known about the patient/caregiver dynamic or how it affects self-care.

Objective: This study seeks to synthesize and evaluate the most recent research focused on the dynamic between patients with heart failure, their caregivers, and their participation in self-care behavior.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted by searching the databases of CINAHL, HealthSource, ProQuest, PsycINFO and PubMed using search terms including heart failure, self-care, caregiver, self-efficacy, and confidence.

Results: A total of 16 studies reviewed found factors affecting patient self-care include caregiver support, caregiver mental and emotional health, and quality and congruity of the caregiver-patient relationship. A caregiving partner is positively associated with patient physical activity, but caregivers can also be barriers to self-care by modeling unhealthy behavior. A caregiver’s emotional state can affect a patient’s own self-care behavior. Patients in high-quality relationships have better self-care confidence, and self-care is improved when patients and caregivers agree on how to collaborate in their relationship. Educational interventions targeting caregivers can be effective especially if they also teach communication skills.

Conclusion: Patients with heart failure can gain great benefit from having an informal caregiver, but complex factors in the relationship can positively or negatively affect patient self-care. Further research to better understand patient-caregiver relationship dynamics will help clinicians tailor effective interventions to improve HF self-care adherence.

Keywords: heart failure, self-care, caregiver, self-efficacy, confidence

 

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