Presenter Information

Chantal BoydFollow
Danielle DoddFollow

Start Date

16-11-2018 2:00 AM

End Date

16-11-2018 2:00 AM

Description

Abstract: This integrative literature review discusses the possible negative effects of the current cervical cancer screening guidelines enforced by the U.S. Preventative Task Force. Potential negative effects of guidelines are examined to determine the need for a more personalized approach in future cervical cancer screening guidelines. The purpose of this integrated literature review is to identify women at greater risk for developing breast cancer and their need to have more frequent screenings. The U.S. Preventative Task Force currently only requires frequent cervical cancer screenings in women who are immunocompromised, due to diseases such as HIV, or women who are diagnosed with cervical cancer. Many women in the United States possess several risk factors that would increase their need for more frequent screenings. Early detection of cervical cancer and disease progression may be compromised when women who are at higher risk are now required to undergo screenings every 3 years instead of annually. A total of n=10 studies were used in this integrative literature review with female participants of various ages, race/ethnicity, and health status that presented a higher risk for developing cervical cancer. Factors presented in these studies that resulted in a higher risk for developing cervical cancer were socioeconomic status, body weight, race, imprisonment, and smoking. From the data shown within the studies, we have concluded that women who present with any of the risk factors stated above may benefit from more frequent screenings to monitor for potential development of cervical cancer.

Keywords: populations, risk, factors, cervical cancer, race, guidelines,barriers

Included in

Nursing Commons

Share

COinS
 
Nov 16th, 2:00 AM Nov 16th, 2:00 AM

Populations at Risk for Cervical Cancer

Abstract: This integrative literature review discusses the possible negative effects of the current cervical cancer screening guidelines enforced by the U.S. Preventative Task Force. Potential negative effects of guidelines are examined to determine the need for a more personalized approach in future cervical cancer screening guidelines. The purpose of this integrated literature review is to identify women at greater risk for developing breast cancer and their need to have more frequent screenings. The U.S. Preventative Task Force currently only requires frequent cervical cancer screenings in women who are immunocompromised, due to diseases such as HIV, or women who are diagnosed with cervical cancer. Many women in the United States possess several risk factors that would increase their need for more frequent screenings. Early detection of cervical cancer and disease progression may be compromised when women who are at higher risk are now required to undergo screenings every 3 years instead of annually. A total of n=10 studies were used in this integrative literature review with female participants of various ages, race/ethnicity, and health status that presented a higher risk for developing cervical cancer. Factors presented in these studies that resulted in a higher risk for developing cervical cancer were socioeconomic status, body weight, race, imprisonment, and smoking. From the data shown within the studies, we have concluded that women who present with any of the risk factors stated above may benefit from more frequent screenings to monitor for potential development of cervical cancer.

Keywords: populations, risk, factors, cervical cancer, race, guidelines,barriers

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.