Start Date

16-11-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

16-11-2018 11:30 AM

Description

The Effects of Exercise on Brain Function in Alzheimer’s Patients

An Integrative Literature Review

Jasmine Perez, MS

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elizabeth Hartman, PhD, RN

Abstract

Background: Alzheimer’s disease affects nearly 26 million people and is the fourth leading cause of death in people over the age of seventy worldwide. There have been enormous amounts of funding and resources invested in the study of Alzheimer’s disease and pharmacological treatment. However, there is currently no disease-modifying or preventative management for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers suggest that if exercise is integrated into the treatment regimen it may have the ability to mitigate or slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to explore and focus on treatments for Alzheimer disease other than pharmacological in nature, such as physical activity.

Methods: An integrative literature review was used. A total of two databases were used to search the literature and obtain sources, including PubMed and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL). Sources that were reviewed were limited to articles over the last 10 years (2009-2018) and a total of 12 articles were used.

Results: Researchers suggested that six elements that include hippocampal volume, functional tasks, amyloid plaques formation, tau formation, synaptic connections, and neurotrophin levels were all affected and/or improved with exercise.

Conclusions: This literature review identified six factors that are affected and/or improved by exercise in patients at risk for or have existing Alzheimer’s disease. Exercise is suggested to improve the negative effects of Alzheimer’s disease and therefore, it would be beneficial for nursing to educate patients on the benefits of conducting exercise into their daily activities of living to perhaps decrease the progressive effects of Alzheimer’s.

Key Words: Alzheimer’s disease, physical activity, and cognitive function

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Nov 16th, 9:30 AM Nov 16th, 11:30 AM

The Effects of Exercise on Brain Function in Alzheimer’s Patients

The Effects of Exercise on Brain Function in Alzheimer’s Patients

An Integrative Literature Review

Jasmine Perez, MS

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elizabeth Hartman, PhD, RN

Abstract

Background: Alzheimer’s disease affects nearly 26 million people and is the fourth leading cause of death in people over the age of seventy worldwide. There have been enormous amounts of funding and resources invested in the study of Alzheimer’s disease and pharmacological treatment. However, there is currently no disease-modifying or preventative management for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers suggest that if exercise is integrated into the treatment regimen it may have the ability to mitigate or slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to explore and focus on treatments for Alzheimer disease other than pharmacological in nature, such as physical activity.

Methods: An integrative literature review was used. A total of two databases were used to search the literature and obtain sources, including PubMed and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL). Sources that were reviewed were limited to articles over the last 10 years (2009-2018) and a total of 12 articles were used.

Results: Researchers suggested that six elements that include hippocampal volume, functional tasks, amyloid plaques formation, tau formation, synaptic connections, and neurotrophin levels were all affected and/or improved with exercise.

Conclusions: This literature review identified six factors that are affected and/or improved by exercise in patients at risk for or have existing Alzheimer’s disease. Exercise is suggested to improve the negative effects of Alzheimer’s disease and therefore, it would be beneficial for nursing to educate patients on the benefits of conducting exercise into their daily activities of living to perhaps decrease the progressive effects of Alzheimer’s.

Key Words: Alzheimer’s disease, physical activity, and cognitive function