Presenter Information

Omolara Alao-AbokoFollow

Start Date

19-3-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

19-3-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Africans hold many beliefs and engage in various practices that shape their health in their countries of origin. African immigrant population in the United States had the fastest immigrant growth rate between the years 2000-2013, increasing by 41% (Anderson, 2017). However, not much is known about how their beliefs impact health-seeking behaviors after immigrating into the U.S.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore and discover the influences of African immigrants’ beliefs on their health-seeking behaviors.

Method: Whitemore & Knafl (2005) was used as a guide for this literature review. A database search of CINAHL, PubMed, ProQuest, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition was conducted to identify the ten articles used in the integrative review. The inclusion criteria for the review were peer-reviewed articles written in English and studies with African immigrant participants.

Results: The literature revealed an association between African immigrants’ beliefs and health-seeking behaviors, with the exception of one. Many African immigrants’ beliefs limited their utilization of healthcare services; some promoted health-seeking behaviors, while one study showed no statistical significance between their beliefs and health-seeking behaviors. Religion, stigma, trust/distrust of healthcare professionals, immigration status, gender, insurance, traditional beliefs, and lack of knowledge were significant factors that impacted African-immigrants’ health-seeking behaviors.

Nursing Implications: A better understanding of this population’s beliefs and health practices can promote health education and improve health outcomes in this population.

Conclusion: Findings from this integrative literature review revealed that African immigrants living in the U.S. believed and engaged in several practices that limited their health-seeking behaviors. More research needs to be done on the beliefs that influence African immigrants and how those beliefs affect their health-seeking behaviors in order to improve health outcomes in this minority population.

Keywords: African immigrants, culture, beliefs, health-seeking behaviors

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Mar 19th, 10:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:30 AM

The Influence of African Immigrants’ Beliefs on Health-Seeking Behaviors: An Integrative Literature Review

Abstract

Background: Africans hold many beliefs and engage in various practices that shape their health in their countries of origin. African immigrant population in the United States had the fastest immigrant growth rate between the years 2000-2013, increasing by 41% (Anderson, 2017). However, not much is known about how their beliefs impact health-seeking behaviors after immigrating into the U.S.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore and discover the influences of African immigrants’ beliefs on their health-seeking behaviors.

Method: Whitemore & Knafl (2005) was used as a guide for this literature review. A database search of CINAHL, PubMed, ProQuest, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition was conducted to identify the ten articles used in the integrative review. The inclusion criteria for the review were peer-reviewed articles written in English and studies with African immigrant participants.

Results: The literature revealed an association between African immigrants’ beliefs and health-seeking behaviors, with the exception of one. Many African immigrants’ beliefs limited their utilization of healthcare services; some promoted health-seeking behaviors, while one study showed no statistical significance between their beliefs and health-seeking behaviors. Religion, stigma, trust/distrust of healthcare professionals, immigration status, gender, insurance, traditional beliefs, and lack of knowledge were significant factors that impacted African-immigrants’ health-seeking behaviors.

Nursing Implications: A better understanding of this population’s beliefs and health practices can promote health education and improve health outcomes in this population.

Conclusion: Findings from this integrative literature review revealed that African immigrants living in the U.S. believed and engaged in several practices that limited their health-seeking behaviors. More research needs to be done on the beliefs that influence African immigrants and how those beliefs affect their health-seeking behaviors in order to improve health outcomes in this minority population.

Keywords: African immigrants, culture, beliefs, health-seeking behaviors

 

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