Presenter Information

megan mastersFollow

Start Date

19-3-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

19-3-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Background: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that can infect both males and females, potentially causing genital warts, vaginal, cervical, anal, and vulvar cancers. According to CDC guidelines, the HPV vaccine can be given to boys and girls age 9 to 26 (CDC, 2017). Although cases of HPV have dropped as the number of HPV vaccinations rise, vaccine rates are still far below the Health People 2020 target of 80% coverage. With current rates of 49.5% coverage in females, and 37.5% in males through 2017, it is evident that current routes of vaccine education are not adequate (CDC, 2017).

Objective: The purpose of this literature review is to identify the factors why parents/guardians would choose not to vaccinate their children against HPV and the roles of health care providers in informing parents about the HPV vaccination. This information would then allow other medical professionals to target certain stigma’s regarding this vaccine in order to improve overall vaccination numbers.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted to identify the current factors influencing patients/guardians’ refusal of the HPV vaccination, and what role the healthcare provider plays in this decision.

Discussion: Patients lack of education regarding the HPV vaccine was the most common factor affecting their decision not to receive the vaccination. The extent of this deficiency of education ranged from patients not aware of an HPV vaccine, to providers’ not effectively discussing the vaccine with patients. The role of the healthcare provider was also determined to play a significant factor in compliance with HPV vaccination. Barriers focused on providers either not recommending HPV vaccination, or providing inconsistent or ineffective recommendations.

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Mar 19th, 10:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:30 AM

Exploring Reasons for Opting Out of HPV Vaccination Among Patients and Health Care Providers

Background: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that can infect both males and females, potentially causing genital warts, vaginal, cervical, anal, and vulvar cancers. According to CDC guidelines, the HPV vaccine can be given to boys and girls age 9 to 26 (CDC, 2017). Although cases of HPV have dropped as the number of HPV vaccinations rise, vaccine rates are still far below the Health People 2020 target of 80% coverage. With current rates of 49.5% coverage in females, and 37.5% in males through 2017, it is evident that current routes of vaccine education are not adequate (CDC, 2017).

Objective: The purpose of this literature review is to identify the factors why parents/guardians would choose not to vaccinate their children against HPV and the roles of health care providers in informing parents about the HPV vaccination. This information would then allow other medical professionals to target certain stigma’s regarding this vaccine in order to improve overall vaccination numbers.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted to identify the current factors influencing patients/guardians’ refusal of the HPV vaccination, and what role the healthcare provider plays in this decision.

Discussion: Patients lack of education regarding the HPV vaccine was the most common factor affecting their decision not to receive the vaccination. The extent of this deficiency of education ranged from patients not aware of an HPV vaccine, to providers’ not effectively discussing the vaccine with patients. The role of the healthcare provider was also determined to play a significant factor in compliance with HPV vaccination. Barriers focused on providers either not recommending HPV vaccination, or providing inconsistent or ineffective recommendations.