Start Date

19-3-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

19-3-2018 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

The purpose of this analysis was to explore the possible benefits of a blood screening to be coupled with the annual routine check-up. Blood screenings are only administered upon reasonable suspicion of pathology. Upon the examination of current research concerning ferritin levels within the blood, one can speculate the existence of strong correlations between ferritin levels, inflammatory disease and early morality. Cause for concern stems from the fact that the ferritin levels of the vast majority of people in the US are completely unknown.

Ferritin levels are the most accurate marker for measuring the amount of iron being stored in the human body. Ferritin levels measured higher than 300 mcg/L for men and 200 mcg/L for women represent chronic iron toxicity (Schrier & Bacon, 2017). Although iron toxicity has been studied much less then iron deficiency, there has been some experimentation performed. This literature review will gather relevant works and will use the RE-AIM Framework to interpret the data compiled.

Results of the literature review reinforced the theory that there is a relationship between ferritin levels, inflammatory disease and early mortality. The inflammatory diseases studied include, but are not limited to cancer, endocrinological disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes type II. The implications of these findings may potentially have a transformative effect on preventative care. A strong enough relationship between the variables suggest that high ferritin levels may either be a stark precursor to inflammatory disease, or conversely, an invaluable marker for it. Future research may be geared toward discovering which one of these two relationships best describe this correlation.

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Mar 19th, 10:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:30 AM

Should ferritin tests be added to routine screening: An integrative literature review

Abstract

The purpose of this analysis was to explore the possible benefits of a blood screening to be coupled with the annual routine check-up. Blood screenings are only administered upon reasonable suspicion of pathology. Upon the examination of current research concerning ferritin levels within the blood, one can speculate the existence of strong correlations between ferritin levels, inflammatory disease and early morality. Cause for concern stems from the fact that the ferritin levels of the vast majority of people in the US are completely unknown.

Ferritin levels are the most accurate marker for measuring the amount of iron being stored in the human body. Ferritin levels measured higher than 300 mcg/L for men and 200 mcg/L for women represent chronic iron toxicity (Schrier & Bacon, 2017). Although iron toxicity has been studied much less then iron deficiency, there has been some experimentation performed. This literature review will gather relevant works and will use the RE-AIM Framework to interpret the data compiled.

Results of the literature review reinforced the theory that there is a relationship between ferritin levels, inflammatory disease and early mortality. The inflammatory diseases studied include, but are not limited to cancer, endocrinological disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes type II. The implications of these findings may potentially have a transformative effect on preventative care. A strong enough relationship between the variables suggest that high ferritin levels may either be a stark precursor to inflammatory disease, or conversely, an invaluable marker for it. Future research may be geared toward discovering which one of these two relationships best describe this correlation.

 

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