Presenter Information

Katarina DonkersFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Anti-histamine Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis: A Literature Review

Katarina Donkers

Angel Butron

Background: Over 30 million individuals in the United States suffer from some form of atopic dermatitis, which is why it is essential to review current treatment options and determine their effectiveness.

Objectives: To address this issue, a literature review was performed to determine if antihistamines are considered safe and effective for long term treatment as well as if patients can develop tolerance.

Method: A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine the effects of antihistamines using peer-reviewed articles. Articles included were written in English, discussed antihistamines as a treatment option, used human subjects, and were written in the last ten years.

Findings/Results: First and second-generation antihistamines can be beneficial for patients with atopic dermatitis, though there are many factors that contribute to the possibility of long-term use. The primary use of first-generation antihistamines is to mildly sedate the patient so they don’t itch any flare-ups and further exacerbate their atopic dermatitis, which does not make them a suitable option for patients who have to focus on things such as work or driving. Second-generation antihistamines are regarded as a newer model of antihistamines and are selective H1-receptor antagonists and do not have the sedative effects of first generation drugs. It is unknown if tolerance can occur with first generation antihistamines, but patients do not develop tolerance to second generation antihistamines with regular use.

Conclusion: There can be a positive influence in the long-term use of antihistamines as supportive therapy, though second generation antihistamines are preferred due to their lack of CNS adverse effects and anti-inflammatory properties with continued use. Further research is needed pertaining to specific drug interactions as well as newer treatment options for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis in conjunction with first line treatment.

Included in

Nursing Commons

Share

COinS
 
Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Antihistamine Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis

Anti-histamine Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis: A Literature Review

Katarina Donkers

Angel Butron

Background: Over 30 million individuals in the United States suffer from some form of atopic dermatitis, which is why it is essential to review current treatment options and determine their effectiveness.

Objectives: To address this issue, a literature review was performed to determine if antihistamines are considered safe and effective for long term treatment as well as if patients can develop tolerance.

Method: A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine the effects of antihistamines using peer-reviewed articles. Articles included were written in English, discussed antihistamines as a treatment option, used human subjects, and were written in the last ten years.

Findings/Results: First and second-generation antihistamines can be beneficial for patients with atopic dermatitis, though there are many factors that contribute to the possibility of long-term use. The primary use of first-generation antihistamines is to mildly sedate the patient so they don’t itch any flare-ups and further exacerbate their atopic dermatitis, which does not make them a suitable option for patients who have to focus on things such as work or driving. Second-generation antihistamines are regarded as a newer model of antihistamines and are selective H1-receptor antagonists and do not have the sedative effects of first generation drugs. It is unknown if tolerance can occur with first generation antihistamines, but patients do not develop tolerance to second generation antihistamines with regular use.

Conclusion: There can be a positive influence in the long-term use of antihistamines as supportive therapy, though second generation antihistamines are preferred due to their lack of CNS adverse effects and anti-inflammatory properties with continued use. Further research is needed pertaining to specific drug interactions as well as newer treatment options for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis in conjunction with first line treatment.