Presenter Information

Sara BourqueFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: In a survey conducted between the years of 2011 and 2014 it was suggested that 36% of adults in the U.S. were obese with over 40.2% being middle aged adults. Obesity is associated with a number of comorbid conditions including diabetes, heart attacks, and strokes. Due to this it is one of the major factors driving up our annual medical care costs. It is also one of the leading causes of death not only in the U.S. but worldwide. With one third of the adult population in the U.S. being obese food addiction may very well be a factor.

Objective: The aim of this study was to synthesize the research available on food addiction and possible treatment options for those suffering from this addiction.

Methods: The format of the paper was an integrative literature review. Articles were found using the following databases: CINAHL, PsychINFO, PubMed, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source.

Results: After examining the literature food addiction was explained as an addiction that can be diagnosed like drug addiction through the use of the DSM-IV. In looking at the brain an increased excitement of the dopamine pathway in response to food was also noted. Treatment options highlighted in the research ranged from cognitive behavioral therapy to 12 step programs. Supplements noted to reduce addiction and medications that would block the receptors that play a role in food consumption and dopamine receptors were also discussed.

Conclusion: The treatments and therapies explained in the literature are merely only suggestions. Most have yet to be tried on actual adult food addicts. In the future further studies should be conducted testing these treatment options on actual adult food addicts and also using a combination of the therapies together to see if that would lead to a better outcome.

Keywords: food addiction, over-compulsive eating, binge eating, treatments or therapies, and solutions to addiction

integrative lit review- final .docx (116 kB)
Body of my paper

Share

COinS
 
Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Food Addiction and the Effective Treatment of Adult Food Addicts: An Integrative Review of Literature

Abstract

Background: In a survey conducted between the years of 2011 and 2014 it was suggested that 36% of adults in the U.S. were obese with over 40.2% being middle aged adults. Obesity is associated with a number of comorbid conditions including diabetes, heart attacks, and strokes. Due to this it is one of the major factors driving up our annual medical care costs. It is also one of the leading causes of death not only in the U.S. but worldwide. With one third of the adult population in the U.S. being obese food addiction may very well be a factor.

Objective: The aim of this study was to synthesize the research available on food addiction and possible treatment options for those suffering from this addiction.

Methods: The format of the paper was an integrative literature review. Articles were found using the following databases: CINAHL, PsychINFO, PubMed, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source.

Results: After examining the literature food addiction was explained as an addiction that can be diagnosed like drug addiction through the use of the DSM-IV. In looking at the brain an increased excitement of the dopamine pathway in response to food was also noted. Treatment options highlighted in the research ranged from cognitive behavioral therapy to 12 step programs. Supplements noted to reduce addiction and medications that would block the receptors that play a role in food consumption and dopamine receptors were also discussed.

Conclusion: The treatments and therapies explained in the literature are merely only suggestions. Most have yet to be tried on actual adult food addicts. In the future further studies should be conducted testing these treatment options on actual adult food addicts and also using a combination of the therapies together to see if that would lead to a better outcome.

Keywords: food addiction, over-compulsive eating, binge eating, treatments or therapies, and solutions to addiction

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.