Presenter Information

Pamela KatzFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Shared decision-making (SDM) has emerged as the preferred model for decision-making in treatment decisions for cancer patients. Patient outcomes are maximized when this model is used since the patient is more engaged and empowered to be a part of their care. Yet, there are many barriers to participation in SDM that must be overcome from the patient, practitioner, and structural perspectives. It is important to find a way to accurately measure nurses’ competency in SDM since they are the ones spending the lion’s share of time with patients.

Theoretical Framework: The framework for SDM has evolved over the years to encompass a greater circle of participants in the model. No longer is it just the dyad of patient and practitioner, but rather it now includes individuals such as family members, nurses, and other clinicians. The framework was updated to reflect current practice and reflects a dynamic process with detailed steps involved with SDM that can impact day-to-day practice (Charles, Gafni, & Whelan, 1999).

Methods: This study utilized a descriptive online survey and the SDMS-N tool was sent to oncology nurses in and out of the Chicago area. The survey measured 22 key variables within three domains of nursing practice: knowledge, attitudes, and skills. A convenience sample of 226 nurses was recruited and the data was measured with a 5-point Likert scale for each subset of questions.

Results: The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure was used to determine if the variables share common factors. In this study, the KMO was .909 which indicates sampling adequacy and it meets the partial correlations assumption. Bartlett’s test of sphericity was used to test the null hypothesis. In this study, the Bartlett's test was statistically significant (p=

Conclusions: The SDMS tool was found to be a valid and reliable scale/tool that can measure the competencies of nurses during the Shared Decision Making process. There were three subscales that that were theoretically developed for this study. The parallel analysis completed as part of the Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) determined there to be four (4) subscale factors. The revised subscales now include “Attitudes, Communications Skills, Adaptability & Implementation Skills, and Knowledge”. The SDM-N Competency Tool is a new valid and reliable tool with excellent psychometric properties.

SDMS-N research day presentation.pdf (1024 kB)
powerpoint presentation (will present from internet)

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Development and Testing of Cancer Treatment Shared Decision Making Scale for Nurses

Abstract

Background: Shared decision-making (SDM) has emerged as the preferred model for decision-making in treatment decisions for cancer patients. Patient outcomes are maximized when this model is used since the patient is more engaged and empowered to be a part of their care. Yet, there are many barriers to participation in SDM that must be overcome from the patient, practitioner, and structural perspectives. It is important to find a way to accurately measure nurses’ competency in SDM since they are the ones spending the lion’s share of time with patients.

Theoretical Framework: The framework for SDM has evolved over the years to encompass a greater circle of participants in the model. No longer is it just the dyad of patient and practitioner, but rather it now includes individuals such as family members, nurses, and other clinicians. The framework was updated to reflect current practice and reflects a dynamic process with detailed steps involved with SDM that can impact day-to-day practice (Charles, Gafni, & Whelan, 1999).

Methods: This study utilized a descriptive online survey and the SDMS-N tool was sent to oncology nurses in and out of the Chicago area. The survey measured 22 key variables within three domains of nursing practice: knowledge, attitudes, and skills. A convenience sample of 226 nurses was recruited and the data was measured with a 5-point Likert scale for each subset of questions.

Results: The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure was used to determine if the variables share common factors. In this study, the KMO was .909 which indicates sampling adequacy and it meets the partial correlations assumption. Bartlett’s test of sphericity was used to test the null hypothesis. In this study, the Bartlett's test was statistically significant (p=

Conclusions: The SDMS tool was found to be a valid and reliable scale/tool that can measure the competencies of nurses during the Shared Decision Making process. There were three subscales that that were theoretically developed for this study. The parallel analysis completed as part of the Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) determined there to be four (4) subscale factors. The revised subscales now include “Attitudes, Communications Skills, Adaptability & Implementation Skills, and Knowledge”. The SDM-N Competency Tool is a new valid and reliable tool with excellent psychometric properties.

 

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