Presenter Information

Kelsey MoranFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Background: Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbirth, affecting 11-20% of women who give birth each year. Women suffering from PPD may experience feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and anxiety related to birth, and may think of suicide or harm towards their baby. Nutrition plays a key role in the onset, severity, and duration of general depression. Although nutritional deficiencies can be prevalent among all Americans, they disproportionately affect low-income individuals. There is currently a knowledge gap regarding postpartum depression causation in low-income women. It is important to understand the cause of postpartum depression to provide appropriate intervention strategies.

Objectives: This purpose of this integrative literature review was to determine the effects of socioeconomic status on nutrition and its relationship leading to postpartum depression for low-income women.

Method: A computerized search of the literature was employed using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Pubmed and Academic Search Complete. Literature was compiled from a variety of different peer-reviewed journals between 2012 and 2017.

Results: Two common themes were identified to contribute to socioeconomic status and postpartum depression, including food deserts and lack of prenatal care. Four nutrients were discovered to influence postpartum depression among low-income women. The nutrients that were most commonly cited in the literature included Folic acid, Omega fatty acids, Vitamin D, and Selenium.

Conclusions: It cannot be determined if nutrition is the only contributing factor to postpartum depression, due to the multitude of risk factors most women experience who have been diagnosed with postpartum depression. It also cannot be determined which nutrient plays a more significant role in developing postpartum depression, or if it is a combination of certain nutrients. Overall, it is imperative that future research be conducted to determine the effects of prenatal nutrients on postpartum depression. By identifying the relationship between socioeconomic status, nutrition, and postpartum depression, prevention programs may be designed to better care for low-income women.

Key Words: postpartum depression, PPD, nutrition, socioeconomic status, SES, and low-income.

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Prenatal Nutrition and Postpartum Depression

Background: Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbirth, affecting 11-20% of women who give birth each year. Women suffering from PPD may experience feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and anxiety related to birth, and may think of suicide or harm towards their baby. Nutrition plays a key role in the onset, severity, and duration of general depression. Although nutritional deficiencies can be prevalent among all Americans, they disproportionately affect low-income individuals. There is currently a knowledge gap regarding postpartum depression causation in low-income women. It is important to understand the cause of postpartum depression to provide appropriate intervention strategies.

Objectives: This purpose of this integrative literature review was to determine the effects of socioeconomic status on nutrition and its relationship leading to postpartum depression for low-income women.

Method: A computerized search of the literature was employed using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Pubmed and Academic Search Complete. Literature was compiled from a variety of different peer-reviewed journals between 2012 and 2017.

Results: Two common themes were identified to contribute to socioeconomic status and postpartum depression, including food deserts and lack of prenatal care. Four nutrients were discovered to influence postpartum depression among low-income women. The nutrients that were most commonly cited in the literature included Folic acid, Omega fatty acids, Vitamin D, and Selenium.

Conclusions: It cannot be determined if nutrition is the only contributing factor to postpartum depression, due to the multitude of risk factors most women experience who have been diagnosed with postpartum depression. It also cannot be determined which nutrient plays a more significant role in developing postpartum depression, or if it is a combination of certain nutrients. Overall, it is imperative that future research be conducted to determine the effects of prenatal nutrients on postpartum depression. By identifying the relationship between socioeconomic status, nutrition, and postpartum depression, prevention programs may be designed to better care for low-income women.

Key Words: postpartum depression, PPD, nutrition, socioeconomic status, SES, and low-income.