Presenter Information

Jill SearsFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Background: Clinicians perceptions of domestic violence victims in the LGBT community when presenting in the Emergency Department environment creates barriers to timely identification.

Objectives: A literature review examined clinician’s perceptions of domestic violence in the LGBT compared to heterosexuals and how those perceptions create barrier to identification of victims.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted utilizing four databases including: Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (Cinnahl) Complete, Proquest Nursing & Allied Health Source, Psychinfo, and PubMed. Key search words used and included “domestic violence”, “intimate partner violence”, “gay”, “homosexual”, “lesbian”, “LGBT”, “LGBTQ”, “perceptions”, “same-sex”, “identification”, “barriers”.

Results: Clinician perceive same-sex domestic violence scenarios as less serious than opposite-sex domestic violence and as less likely to get worse over time. While clinicians acknowledge the importance of screening patients for domestic violence they convey that, the time to do so is their biggest barrier.

Conclusion: Due to the lack of information regarding clinicians’ perceptions of domestic violence in the LGBT community and the lack of time for screening; further studies need to be conducted to more accurately identify specific barriers that prevent identification.

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Barriers to Identification of Domestic Violence Victims in LGBTQ Populations

Background: Clinicians perceptions of domestic violence victims in the LGBT community when presenting in the Emergency Department environment creates barriers to timely identification.

Objectives: A literature review examined clinician’s perceptions of domestic violence in the LGBT compared to heterosexuals and how those perceptions create barrier to identification of victims.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted utilizing four databases including: Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (Cinnahl) Complete, Proquest Nursing & Allied Health Source, Psychinfo, and PubMed. Key search words used and included “domestic violence”, “intimate partner violence”, “gay”, “homosexual”, “lesbian”, “LGBT”, “LGBTQ”, “perceptions”, “same-sex”, “identification”, “barriers”.

Results: Clinician perceive same-sex domestic violence scenarios as less serious than opposite-sex domestic violence and as less likely to get worse over time. While clinicians acknowledge the importance of screening patients for domestic violence they convey that, the time to do so is their biggest barrier.

Conclusion: Due to the lack of information regarding clinicians’ perceptions of domestic violence in the LGBT community and the lack of time for screening; further studies need to be conducted to more accurately identify specific barriers that prevent identification.