Presenter Information

Suthiratana Bhudvanbhen-JungFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Provider Barriers to Delivery of Quality Transgender Healthcare

Background: Transgender encompasses anyone who does not identify with the gender they were assigned at birth. Due to the previous DSM-IV Gender Identity Disorder diagnosis, transgender was considered a pathology. The 2013 DSM-V switch to Gender Dysphoria depathologized the transgender identity. Subsequently, transgender care is now covered by insurance and considered part of expected patient care when before it was not covered. This research study focuses on provider reported barriers to trans healthcare over patient reported, though some patient reports were used in conjunction with provider perspective.

Objective: The objective of this integrative literature review is to determine the main obstacles for providers when delivering standard or transitional healthcare for transgender individuals and determine the best ways to dismantle these obstacles constructively and ethically.

Research Design: This integrative literature review follows the design of Whittlemore and Knafl to allow for more types of studies to be considered for relevance.

Method: Research was conducted using CINAHL, ProQuest, and PubMed. For articles that did not meet search criteria, references were used to find other, more pertinent articles. Key words include: provider, barrier, transgender health. A score of 1 or 2 was given to each article to signify the rigor and relevancy of the study to the objective.

Results: Three main themes emerged from the literature review: Provider Bias, Lack of Training and Exposure, and Cultural Competency. Provider bias revealed medical staff inability to agree on methods of treatment for trans patients as well as systemic refusal from insurance companies to cover transgender care. Lack of training and exposure covers the lack of solid LGBTQ curricula and lack of exposure to transgender patients for medical staff prior to entering practice. Cultural competency explains the diversity of the trans community making it difficult for providers to understand the population as well as the need for cultural competency training for medical providers.

Discussion: Providers and nurses need cultural competency training to better interact with and provide proper care for the transgender patient population. As the number of individuals who identify as transgender rises in the U.S., the need for LGBTQ curricula and cultural competency training becomes more and more vital to ensure quality care is delivered.

Author: Suthiratana Bhudvanbhen-Jung

Institutional Affiliation/Position Title: Graduate Student, DePaul University, School of Nursing

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Provider Barriers to Delivery of Quality Transgender Healthcare

Provider Barriers to Delivery of Quality Transgender Healthcare

Background: Transgender encompasses anyone who does not identify with the gender they were assigned at birth. Due to the previous DSM-IV Gender Identity Disorder diagnosis, transgender was considered a pathology. The 2013 DSM-V switch to Gender Dysphoria depathologized the transgender identity. Subsequently, transgender care is now covered by insurance and considered part of expected patient care when before it was not covered. This research study focuses on provider reported barriers to trans healthcare over patient reported, though some patient reports were used in conjunction with provider perspective.

Objective: The objective of this integrative literature review is to determine the main obstacles for providers when delivering standard or transitional healthcare for transgender individuals and determine the best ways to dismantle these obstacles constructively and ethically.

Research Design: This integrative literature review follows the design of Whittlemore and Knafl to allow for more types of studies to be considered for relevance.

Method: Research was conducted using CINAHL, ProQuest, and PubMed. For articles that did not meet search criteria, references were used to find other, more pertinent articles. Key words include: provider, barrier, transgender health. A score of 1 or 2 was given to each article to signify the rigor and relevancy of the study to the objective.

Results: Three main themes emerged from the literature review: Provider Bias, Lack of Training and Exposure, and Cultural Competency. Provider bias revealed medical staff inability to agree on methods of treatment for trans patients as well as systemic refusal from insurance companies to cover transgender care. Lack of training and exposure covers the lack of solid LGBTQ curricula and lack of exposure to transgender patients for medical staff prior to entering practice. Cultural competency explains the diversity of the trans community making it difficult for providers to understand the population as well as the need for cultural competency training for medical providers.

Discussion: Providers and nurses need cultural competency training to better interact with and provide proper care for the transgender patient population. As the number of individuals who identify as transgender rises in the U.S., the need for LGBTQ curricula and cultural competency training becomes more and more vital to ensure quality care is delivered.

Author: Suthiratana Bhudvanbhen-Jung

Institutional Affiliation/Position Title: Graduate Student, DePaul University, School of Nursing