Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Anesthesia practitioners are familiar with awareness with recall (AWR) as a phenomenon, however, research has shown it is inadequately assessed, evaluated, and treated in patients receiving general anesthesia leading to significant undesired sequela.

Objectives: The purpose of this quality improvement project (QIP) was to attempt to improve the perceived knowledge and comfort of anesthesia practitioners relative to the assessment, evaluation, and treatment of patients with AWR, thus, closing the gap between knowledge and practice.

Method: The sample consisted of 150 anesthesia practitioners from the Northshore University HealthSystem. Pre-and post-test Likert-type surveys were used and uploaded into Qualtrics to maintain anonymity and SPSS for analysis.

Results: At pre-test, the overall perceived knowledge, comfort and attitudes on AWR (M = 2.59; SD = 0.45) was suboptimal for current practice. At post-test, the overall perceived knowledge, comfort and attitudes on AWR (M = 3.41; SD = .29) was optimal. A perceived knowledge subset analysis resulted (M = 13.71; SD = 2.61, respectively) and Cohen d statistics (d = 1.466), Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.72. A perceived comfort subset analysis resulted (M = 3.71; SD = 1.86, respectively) and Cohen d statistics (d = 1.17), Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for this subscale was 0.85. Attitudes towards AWR had an inadequate Cronbach's alpha coefficient value of less than 0.7. No subset analysis was performed.

Conclusion: The results showed improved perceived knowledge and comfort of assessment, evaluation and treatment of AWR. This is a useful indicator for communication and training needs in the initiation of our educational program as a standard protocol in a local practice setting.

Included in

Other Nursing Commons

Share

COinS
 
Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Intra-operative Awareness with Recall under General Anesthesia

Abstract

Background: Anesthesia practitioners are familiar with awareness with recall (AWR) as a phenomenon, however, research has shown it is inadequately assessed, evaluated, and treated in patients receiving general anesthesia leading to significant undesired sequela.

Objectives: The purpose of this quality improvement project (QIP) was to attempt to improve the perceived knowledge and comfort of anesthesia practitioners relative to the assessment, evaluation, and treatment of patients with AWR, thus, closing the gap between knowledge and practice.

Method: The sample consisted of 150 anesthesia practitioners from the Northshore University HealthSystem. Pre-and post-test Likert-type surveys were used and uploaded into Qualtrics to maintain anonymity and SPSS for analysis.

Results: At pre-test, the overall perceived knowledge, comfort and attitudes on AWR (M = 2.59; SD = 0.45) was suboptimal for current practice. At post-test, the overall perceived knowledge, comfort and attitudes on AWR (M = 3.41; SD = .29) was optimal. A perceived knowledge subset analysis resulted (M = 13.71; SD = 2.61, respectively) and Cohen d statistics (d = 1.466), Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.72. A perceived comfort subset analysis resulted (M = 3.71; SD = 1.86, respectively) and Cohen d statistics (d = 1.17), Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for this subscale was 0.85. Attitudes towards AWR had an inadequate Cronbach's alpha coefficient value of less than 0.7. No subset analysis was performed.

Conclusion: The results showed improved perceived knowledge and comfort of assessment, evaluation and treatment of AWR. This is a useful indicator for communication and training needs in the initiation of our educational program as a standard protocol in a local practice setting.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.