Presenter Information

Sarah Jane SoffelFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Delirium commonly affects hospitalized elderly patients, and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity, among other detrimental outcomes. Delirium is increasing in prevalence, yet remains under detected. Many of the negative effects of hospitalization, such as immobility, dehydration, and polypharmacy, increase the risk for developing delirium. Early detection of delirium remains an important factor for treatment and reversal. The aim of the integrative literature review was to determine whether delirium rates are increasing among elderly hospitalized patients, as well as to identify risk factors associated with delirium and nursing interventions that may prevent the increasing prevalence of delirium. The study is an integrative literature review, in which literature was analyzed to determine rates of delirium, risk factors to developing delirium, and interventions needed to decrease the rates and the risks. The literature used for the integrative review was found in the following databases: CINAHL Complete, ScienceDirect, PubMed and SAGE. The terms searched while researching this topic included: delirium, elderly, and hospitalized. Delirium remains under detected in elderly hospitalized patients, and those it affects have poorer outcomes and higher mortality rates post-hospitalization. Nurses must tailor their interventions to best prevent and treat patients with delirium. Further research is needed on alternatives to hospitalization that provide a multidisciplinary approach with skilled and passionate providers knowledgeable in caring for the complex needs of elders.

Keywords: delirium, elderly, hospitalized

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Delirium Rates Increasing in Elderly Hospitalized Patients

Delirium commonly affects hospitalized elderly patients, and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity, among other detrimental outcomes. Delirium is increasing in prevalence, yet remains under detected. Many of the negative effects of hospitalization, such as immobility, dehydration, and polypharmacy, increase the risk for developing delirium. Early detection of delirium remains an important factor for treatment and reversal. The aim of the integrative literature review was to determine whether delirium rates are increasing among elderly hospitalized patients, as well as to identify risk factors associated with delirium and nursing interventions that may prevent the increasing prevalence of delirium. The study is an integrative literature review, in which literature was analyzed to determine rates of delirium, risk factors to developing delirium, and interventions needed to decrease the rates and the risks. The literature used for the integrative review was found in the following databases: CINAHL Complete, ScienceDirect, PubMed and SAGE. The terms searched while researching this topic included: delirium, elderly, and hospitalized. Delirium remains under detected in elderly hospitalized patients, and those it affects have poorer outcomes and higher mortality rates post-hospitalization. Nurses must tailor their interventions to best prevent and treat patients with delirium. Further research is needed on alternatives to hospitalization that provide a multidisciplinary approach with skilled and passionate providers knowledgeable in caring for the complex needs of elders.

Keywords: delirium, elderly, hospitalized

 

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