Presenter Information

Bojan KojovicFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Decision Aids Utilized by Patients and Clinicians During Shared Treatment

Decision Making for Multiple Myeloma: An Integrative Literature Review

DePaul University: School of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor: Joseph D Tariman PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FAAN

Bojan Kojovic

Abstract

Background: A consolidated and streamlined evaluation of treatment decision aids (DAs) for multiple myeloma is devoid within literature.

Objective: This integrative review determined what treatment-related decision aids are utilized by either patients, clinicians, or both; and, it utilized Melnyk and Fineout-Overholt’s (2011) Hierarchy of Evidence to systematically compile and appraise available DAs.

Method: DePaul WorldCat Local, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases with the following Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms and search details were utilized, obtaining a highly relevant search yield: multiple myeloma AND decision aid. The final analysis included articles reporting on decision aid, clinical practice guidelines for patients with multiple myeloma.

Results: Utilizing the final 29 articles in this integrative literature review (ILR) the following results were revealed: twelve DAs (41.4%) were based on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or clinical practice guidelines developed by myeloma experts, 4 DAs (13.8%) were based on controlled, but nonrandomized, another 4 DAs (13.8%) were based on a systematic review of descriptive & qualitative studies, 3 DAs (10.3%) were based on case control or cohort studies, and 1 DA (3.4%) was based on a single descriptive or qualitative study; finally, only 5 DAs (17.2%) intended for use by patients and caregivers were based on an expert opinion.

Conclusion: This integrative review’s findings reveal urgency in developing effective patient decision aids, helping address the values and preferences of patients with myeloma; furthermore, a randomized controlled trial testing effectiveness of patient decision aids is lacking.

Keywords: multiple myeloma, decision aids, decision support techniques

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Decision Aids Utilized by Patients and Clinicians During Shared Treatment Decision Making for Multiple Myeloma: An Integrative Literature Review

Decision Aids Utilized by Patients and Clinicians During Shared Treatment

Decision Making for Multiple Myeloma: An Integrative Literature Review

DePaul University: School of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor: Joseph D Tariman PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FAAN

Bojan Kojovic

Abstract

Background: A consolidated and streamlined evaluation of treatment decision aids (DAs) for multiple myeloma is devoid within literature.

Objective: This integrative review determined what treatment-related decision aids are utilized by either patients, clinicians, or both; and, it utilized Melnyk and Fineout-Overholt’s (2011) Hierarchy of Evidence to systematically compile and appraise available DAs.

Method: DePaul WorldCat Local, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases with the following Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms and search details were utilized, obtaining a highly relevant search yield: multiple myeloma AND decision aid. The final analysis included articles reporting on decision aid, clinical practice guidelines for patients with multiple myeloma.

Results: Utilizing the final 29 articles in this integrative literature review (ILR) the following results were revealed: twelve DAs (41.4%) were based on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or clinical practice guidelines developed by myeloma experts, 4 DAs (13.8%) were based on controlled, but nonrandomized, another 4 DAs (13.8%) were based on a systematic review of descriptive & qualitative studies, 3 DAs (10.3%) were based on case control or cohort studies, and 1 DA (3.4%) was based on a single descriptive or qualitative study; finally, only 5 DAs (17.2%) intended for use by patients and caregivers were based on an expert opinion.

Conclusion: This integrative review’s findings reveal urgency in developing effective patient decision aids, helping address the values and preferences of patients with myeloma; furthermore, a randomized controlled trial testing effectiveness of patient decision aids is lacking.

Keywords: multiple myeloma, decision aids, decision support techniques