Presenter Information

Nicole ZeppoFollow
Alyse VoronovFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Pediatric Emergence Delirium Assessment and Documentation: Current Practice and Perceived Barriers

Alyse Voronov & Nicole Zeppo

Faculty Sponsor: Susan Krawczyk DNP, CRNA

Background: Current literature addresses the complexity of identifying pediatric emergence delirium (PED), but does not address barriers to PED assessment and documentation. By identifying these barriers, further research can be conducted regarding prevention and treatment of PED.

Objectives: This study aimed to: 1) describe the current PED assessment and documentation practices among post anesthesia care unit (PACU) registered nurses and anesthesia providers at UIHHSS; 2) describe the perceived barriers to PED assessment and documentation; and 3) develop an evidence based educational program to aid in the implementation of a validated PED assessment tool.

Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional online survey design was used to survey a convenience sample of 133 perioperative care providers consisting of anesthesia providers (anesthesiology attendings, anesthesiology residents, and certified registered nurse anesthetists) and PACU registered nurses at UIHHSS. Questions associated with perceived barriers to PED assessment and documentation practice were answered using a 5-point Likert-type response scale, with 1= strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4= agree; 5=strongly agree.

Results: The study received 40 responses during the data collection period for a response rate of 30.0%. Study results revealed current PED assessment and documentation practices at UIHHSS to be inconsistent and varied. Of statistical significance (p= 0.036), was the perceived barrier of “limited time” in the distribution of mean scores based on “how often do you care for pediatric patients.” Preferred learning methods varied, however a majority of participants (n=10) preferred a multimodal approach.

Conclusion: The results of this study revealed the barriers to PED assessment and documentation at UIHHSS, as well as the preferred learning methods of the participants. These results will help facilitate the creation of an evidence based, three-phase educational approach to change of practice at UIHHSS.

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

Pediatric Emergence Delirium Assessment: Current Practice and Perceived Barriers

Pediatric Emergence Delirium Assessment and Documentation: Current Practice and Perceived Barriers

Alyse Voronov & Nicole Zeppo

Faculty Sponsor: Susan Krawczyk DNP, CRNA

Background: Current literature addresses the complexity of identifying pediatric emergence delirium (PED), but does not address barriers to PED assessment and documentation. By identifying these barriers, further research can be conducted regarding prevention and treatment of PED.

Objectives: This study aimed to: 1) describe the current PED assessment and documentation practices among post anesthesia care unit (PACU) registered nurses and anesthesia providers at UIHHSS; 2) describe the perceived barriers to PED assessment and documentation; and 3) develop an evidence based educational program to aid in the implementation of a validated PED assessment tool.

Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional online survey design was used to survey a convenience sample of 133 perioperative care providers consisting of anesthesia providers (anesthesiology attendings, anesthesiology residents, and certified registered nurse anesthetists) and PACU registered nurses at UIHHSS. Questions associated with perceived barriers to PED assessment and documentation practice were answered using a 5-point Likert-type response scale, with 1= strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4= agree; 5=strongly agree.

Results: The study received 40 responses during the data collection period for a response rate of 30.0%. Study results revealed current PED assessment and documentation practices at UIHHSS to be inconsistent and varied. Of statistical significance (p= 0.036), was the perceived barrier of “limited time” in the distribution of mean scores based on “how often do you care for pediatric patients.” Preferred learning methods varied, however a majority of participants (n=10) preferred a multimodal approach.

Conclusion: The results of this study revealed the barriers to PED assessment and documentation at UIHHSS, as well as the preferred learning methods of the participants. These results will help facilitate the creation of an evidence based, three-phase educational approach to change of practice at UIHHSS.

 

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