Presenter Information

Kimberly BrittFollow

Start Date

18-8-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-8-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: Methods of improving homelessness medical adherence are important because homeless populations incur higher than average costs in hospitalizations and medical treatment, disease rates, incarceration, police intervention, and emergency shelter expenses (“Cost of Homelessness,” n.d.). It is valuable to understand the role which Motivational Interviewing (MI) could play in improving medical adherence within the homeless population, thereby increasing the stabilization of homeless individual’s health, and decreasing needless overspending on emergency services.

Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to conduct an integrative literature review to determine if motivational interviewing can improve medical non-adherence with the homeless population.

Method: An integrative review of the literature, in the style of Whittemore & Knafl, was performed using the databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Proquest: Nursing & Allied Health, PubMed-NCBI and Google Scholar. Peer-reviewed, scholarly articles were chosen from the last ten years and ranked for rigor and relevance to the main research question. The Boolean terms included “adherence” OR “non-adherence” or “compliance” with a sub-search of “homeless*” and “motivational interview*”.

Results: Ten works, including a meta-analysis of over 100 studies, met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed for this review. Nine studies concluded MI improved patient adherence and care in some form. Both the health care provider and the patient experienced an improved provider-patient relationship following implementation of this patient-centered communication technique.

Conclusion: Research on MI across healthcare professions, including nursing, medicine and public health supports the potential usefulness of MI as a tool for improving medical adherence within the homeless population.

Key Words: integrative review, patient outcomes, homeless, compliance, adherence & non-adherence, motivational interviewing, nursing

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Aug 18th, 10:00 AM Aug 18th, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Medical Adherence In the Homeless Population

Abstract

Background: Methods of improving homelessness medical adherence are important because homeless populations incur higher than average costs in hospitalizations and medical treatment, disease rates, incarceration, police intervention, and emergency shelter expenses (“Cost of Homelessness,” n.d.). It is valuable to understand the role which Motivational Interviewing (MI) could play in improving medical adherence within the homeless population, thereby increasing the stabilization of homeless individual’s health, and decreasing needless overspending on emergency services.

Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to conduct an integrative literature review to determine if motivational interviewing can improve medical non-adherence with the homeless population.

Method: An integrative review of the literature, in the style of Whittemore & Knafl, was performed using the databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Proquest: Nursing & Allied Health, PubMed-NCBI and Google Scholar. Peer-reviewed, scholarly articles were chosen from the last ten years and ranked for rigor and relevance to the main research question. The Boolean terms included “adherence” OR “non-adherence” or “compliance” with a sub-search of “homeless*” and “motivational interview*”.

Results: Ten works, including a meta-analysis of over 100 studies, met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed for this review. Nine studies concluded MI improved patient adherence and care in some form. Both the health care provider and the patient experienced an improved provider-patient relationship following implementation of this patient-centered communication technique.

Conclusion: Research on MI across healthcare professions, including nursing, medicine and public health supports the potential usefulness of MI as a tool for improving medical adherence within the homeless population.

Key Words: integrative review, patient outcomes, homeless, compliance, adherence & non-adherence, motivational interviewing, nursing

 

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