Presenter Information

Raina ShahFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Pet Therapy is Associated with Reducing Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Combat Veterans: An Integrative Literature Review

Raina Shah

Faculty Sponsor: Larry Maturin, MSN, APN, ACNS-BC, CEN, CCRN

Abstract

Background: The U.S Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects approximately 30% of Vietnam veterans, 12% of Gulf War (Desert Storm) veterans, 11% of veterans of the war in Afghanistan, and 20% of Iraqi war veterans.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to explore and discuss further the use of pet therapy as a non-pharmacologic therapeutic approach to treating PTSD in combat veterans. Pet therapy represents an inclusive and low-risk alternative to veterans who do not benefit from the current pharmacologic and cognitive therapy approaches being utilized.

Methods: This integrative literature review was conducted using keywords post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, pet therapy, veterans, and combat veterans” to search the literature between 2002 and 2017.

Results: A review of literature indicated that service dogs can be a valuable asset to veterans with PTSD by increasing their sense of self-mastery and mitigating the debilitating psychological symptoms associated with PTSD. Service dogs serve a social catalyst and can facilitate interpersonal interactions, reducing anxiety and eliciting positive emotions. Fewer psychiatric symptoms, less substance abuse, and better interpersonal relationships were identified as benefits of pet therapy.

Conclusion: This review found that the use of pet therapy as a non-pharmacologic therapeutic approach to treating PTSD has been effective. The use of pet therapy should be considered as an alternative treatment modality that is more inclusive. With further exploration, pet therapy could increase the number of veterans who seek out treatment and increase the possibility of successfully treating PTSD.

Keywords: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, pet therapy, veterans, combat veterans

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Pet Therapy in Combat Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Pet Therapy is Associated with Reducing Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Combat Veterans: An Integrative Literature Review

Raina Shah

Faculty Sponsor: Larry Maturin, MSN, APN, ACNS-BC, CEN, CCRN

Abstract

Background: The U.S Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects approximately 30% of Vietnam veterans, 12% of Gulf War (Desert Storm) veterans, 11% of veterans of the war in Afghanistan, and 20% of Iraqi war veterans.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to explore and discuss further the use of pet therapy as a non-pharmacologic therapeutic approach to treating PTSD in combat veterans. Pet therapy represents an inclusive and low-risk alternative to veterans who do not benefit from the current pharmacologic and cognitive therapy approaches being utilized.

Methods: This integrative literature review was conducted using keywords post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, pet therapy, veterans, and combat veterans” to search the literature between 2002 and 2017.

Results: A review of literature indicated that service dogs can be a valuable asset to veterans with PTSD by increasing their sense of self-mastery and mitigating the debilitating psychological symptoms associated with PTSD. Service dogs serve a social catalyst and can facilitate interpersonal interactions, reducing anxiety and eliciting positive emotions. Fewer psychiatric symptoms, less substance abuse, and better interpersonal relationships were identified as benefits of pet therapy.

Conclusion: This review found that the use of pet therapy as a non-pharmacologic therapeutic approach to treating PTSD has been effective. The use of pet therapy should be considered as an alternative treatment modality that is more inclusive. With further exploration, pet therapy could increase the number of veterans who seek out treatment and increase the possibility of successfully treating PTSD.

Keywords: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, pet therapy, veterans, combat veterans