Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Background: In 2016, Illinois ranked 39th out of 51 states for overweight and obese children. Rates in Illinois have trended down since 2007 with current reports cite 27% of those aged 10-17 are overweight or obese. Obesity is irrespective of age, race and educational background. Childhood obesity is a risk factor for a myriad of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma, liver disease, joint disorders and psychiatric conditions.

Methods: A secondary data analysis was performed to evaluate a quantitative program intervention aimed at reducing childhood obesity. A convenience sampling methodology was used and extracted from the existing data set. The original data was obtained between 2010-2017 at 21 program sites and includes 884 youth between the ages of 8 to 14 years, in Chicago. The variables used in the convenience sample included age, height, weight and body fat percentage and fat mass.

Results: A significant number of participants experienced a decreased BMI at the culmination of the program and significant decrease in body fat percentage. Fat mass was shown to be a statistically significant decrease, in addition to an overall decrease in body weight. Significant differences in body weight and fat mass were observed between the grouped age ranges. No significant difference for BMI and body fat change was seen based on grouped age ranges. The greatest significance was body fat change and fat mass change. There is a statistically significant difference in body fat change from week 1 and week 8 between DuPage and Cook counties with no difference observed in Will and Kane counties. Further comparisons between counties did not yield significant differences.

Conclusion: ProActive Kids is an early intervention programs that provides a targeted approach to combat childhood obesity during ages of critical development. The findings provide a framework for the future of healthcare interventions for childhood obesity.

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Effectiveness of Early Interventions Strategies on Reducing Body Mass Index in Children in Greater Chicago

Background: In 2016, Illinois ranked 39th out of 51 states for overweight and obese children. Rates in Illinois have trended down since 2007 with current reports cite 27% of those aged 10-17 are overweight or obese. Obesity is irrespective of age, race and educational background. Childhood obesity is a risk factor for a myriad of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma, liver disease, joint disorders and psychiatric conditions.

Methods: A secondary data analysis was performed to evaluate a quantitative program intervention aimed at reducing childhood obesity. A convenience sampling methodology was used and extracted from the existing data set. The original data was obtained between 2010-2017 at 21 program sites and includes 884 youth between the ages of 8 to 14 years, in Chicago. The variables used in the convenience sample included age, height, weight and body fat percentage and fat mass.

Results: A significant number of participants experienced a decreased BMI at the culmination of the program and significant decrease in body fat percentage. Fat mass was shown to be a statistically significant decrease, in addition to an overall decrease in body weight. Significant differences in body weight and fat mass were observed between the grouped age ranges. No significant difference for BMI and body fat change was seen based on grouped age ranges. The greatest significance was body fat change and fat mass change. There is a statistically significant difference in body fat change from week 1 and week 8 between DuPage and Cook counties with no difference observed in Will and Kane counties. Further comparisons between counties did not yield significant differences.

Conclusion: ProActive Kids is an early intervention programs that provides a targeted approach to combat childhood obesity during ages of critical development. The findings provide a framework for the future of healthcare interventions for childhood obesity.

 

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