Presenter Information

Sarah BorghiFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: The death of a nurses’ patient can result in effects both personal and professional. A majority of nursing literature addresses how the nurse can assist a patient through grief. A universal evidence based intervention to assist nurses through a patient death experience does not exist. One specific method, debriefing, was found in multiple primary sources as an intervention to use for healthcare workers.

Objectives: This integrative literature review investigates if debriefing is more beneficial to nurses who experience patient death than other present approaches.

Method: The health promotion framework used to support this integrative literature review was the Salutogenic Theory (ST) (Antonovsky, 1996). The DePaul University WorldCat online library was used to complete the literature search for this review. The databases searched included: WorldCat.org, MEDLINE, OAlster, ABI/INFORM Complete, PsycARTICLES, ERIC, and Academic Search Complete. The keywords used for the search included “nursing”, “patient death” and “debriefing”. The search for the integrated literature review was limited to peer reviewed journal articles published between the years of 1996 and 2016. Articles were limited to those that focused on interventions for healthcare workers coping from a death of a patient.

Results: The results provided three main themes. These themes were that debriefing was found to be helpful after a patient death, if debriefing was not offered to nurses some resorted to sharing the experience with others, and patient death had personal and professional effects on nurses.

Conclusion: There were limited studies found on debriefing methods created exclusively for healthcare workers and nurses. Future research should focus on a reliable and effective universal debriefing method for nurses that experience a patient death.

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Using Debriefing as a More Beneficial Approach to Nurses Who Experience Patient Death: An Integrative Review

Abstract

Background: The death of a nurses’ patient can result in effects both personal and professional. A majority of nursing literature addresses how the nurse can assist a patient through grief. A universal evidence based intervention to assist nurses through a patient death experience does not exist. One specific method, debriefing, was found in multiple primary sources as an intervention to use for healthcare workers.

Objectives: This integrative literature review investigates if debriefing is more beneficial to nurses who experience patient death than other present approaches.

Method: The health promotion framework used to support this integrative literature review was the Salutogenic Theory (ST) (Antonovsky, 1996). The DePaul University WorldCat online library was used to complete the literature search for this review. The databases searched included: WorldCat.org, MEDLINE, OAlster, ABI/INFORM Complete, PsycARTICLES, ERIC, and Academic Search Complete. The keywords used for the search included “nursing”, “patient death” and “debriefing”. The search for the integrated literature review was limited to peer reviewed journal articles published between the years of 1996 and 2016. Articles were limited to those that focused on interventions for healthcare workers coping from a death of a patient.

Results: The results provided three main themes. These themes were that debriefing was found to be helpful after a patient death, if debriefing was not offered to nurses some resorted to sharing the experience with others, and patient death had personal and professional effects on nurses.

Conclusion: There were limited studies found on debriefing methods created exclusively for healthcare workers and nurses. Future research should focus on a reliable and effective universal debriefing method for nurses that experience a patient death.