Presenter Information

Farah SiddiqueFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Decreasing the Rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

by Increasing Nursing Knowledge: An Integrative Literature Review

Farah Siddique

Dr. Elizabeth Hartman, PhD, RN

Background: The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development defined sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) as the unexplained death of an infant younger than one year of age (NICH). Nearly 53,000 infants die each year linked to SIDS in the United States placing parents in a state of severe trauma resulting from the loss of their child.

Objectives: The goal of this integrated literature review was to explore the reasons behind the disconnect between nurse’s knowledge and adherence to prevention guidelines of SIDS.

Methods: An integrated literature review search was conducted using the databases CINAHL and PubMed using the key words: SIDS, parents, caregivers, preventions, patient education, protocols This paper will include information on implications of SIDS, preventive measures and proper patient education techniques.

Results: This study supported the effects associated with increased patient education decreasing the incidence of SIDS by using proper teach back techniques from nurses to parents. Data suggests nurses who understand possible risk factors of SIDS can do a better job educating mothers on prevention methods. This will overall help decrease the incidence of SIDS.

Conclusion: Overall it was found that many hospitals do not have a prevention protocol for SIDS. Preventative measures are being conducted in hospital settings across the nation through use of education and awareness to reduce the occurrence of SIDS. Implementing protocol strategies in a hospital setting is the first step to help this cause.

Keywords: SIDS, parents, caregivers, preventions, patient education, protocols.

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Decreasing the Rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome by Increasing Nursing Knowledge: An Integrative Literature Review

Decreasing the Rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

by Increasing Nursing Knowledge: An Integrative Literature Review

Farah Siddique

Dr. Elizabeth Hartman, PhD, RN

Background: The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development defined sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) as the unexplained death of an infant younger than one year of age (NICH). Nearly 53,000 infants die each year linked to SIDS in the United States placing parents in a state of severe trauma resulting from the loss of their child.

Objectives: The goal of this integrated literature review was to explore the reasons behind the disconnect between nurse’s knowledge and adherence to prevention guidelines of SIDS.

Methods: An integrated literature review search was conducted using the databases CINAHL and PubMed using the key words: SIDS, parents, caregivers, preventions, patient education, protocols This paper will include information on implications of SIDS, preventive measures and proper patient education techniques.

Results: This study supported the effects associated with increased patient education decreasing the incidence of SIDS by using proper teach back techniques from nurses to parents. Data suggests nurses who understand possible risk factors of SIDS can do a better job educating mothers on prevention methods. This will overall help decrease the incidence of SIDS.

Conclusion: Overall it was found that many hospitals do not have a prevention protocol for SIDS. Preventative measures are being conducted in hospital settings across the nation through use of education and awareness to reduce the occurrence of SIDS. Implementing protocol strategies in a hospital setting is the first step to help this cause.

Keywords: SIDS, parents, caregivers, preventions, patient education, protocols.