Presenter Information

Wilsy AbrahamFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Inconsistencies in Geriatric UTI Management in Long Term Care

Wilsy Abraham

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elizabeth Hartman

Abstract

Background: Urinary tract infection is one of the most common infections in nursing home facilities among older adults with studies reporting a 28-day mortality of 5%. Such infections are associated with high rates of morbidity, extended hospital stays, re-hospitalization, and significant healthcare expenses.

Objectives: To identify barriers in adherence to the management of UTI and how effective protocols can benefit the geriatric population. Although guidelines on UTI management are available, there are inconsistencies in adherence to managing the infection among healthcare providers.

Methods: A comprehensive literature review was done including databases CINAHL, PubMed, and UpToDate. The integrative literature review was conducted using key words “UTI, elderly, and management” to search between 2009 and 2017.

Results: Evidence-based guidelines reveal that if appropriate management of UTI is followed better outcomes would result. There are established interventions to increase provider adherence to UTI management guidelines. Barriers to adherence include lack of awareness about management protocol and resistance pattern.

Conclusion: The literature provides appropriate guidelines regarding appropriate management of urinary tract infection. There is a proposed algorithm based on the revised McGeer criteria for UTI in long-term care settings. When working with the geriatric population, health care workers need to be mindful of complex medical conditions in addition to acute infections at rise, like urinary tract infections.

Key words: urinary tract infection, elderly, management

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Inconsistencies in Geriatric UTI Management in Long Term Care

Inconsistencies in Geriatric UTI Management in Long Term Care

Wilsy Abraham

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elizabeth Hartman

Abstract

Background: Urinary tract infection is one of the most common infections in nursing home facilities among older adults with studies reporting a 28-day mortality of 5%. Such infections are associated with high rates of morbidity, extended hospital stays, re-hospitalization, and significant healthcare expenses.

Objectives: To identify barriers in adherence to the management of UTI and how effective protocols can benefit the geriatric population. Although guidelines on UTI management are available, there are inconsistencies in adherence to managing the infection among healthcare providers.

Methods: A comprehensive literature review was done including databases CINAHL, PubMed, and UpToDate. The integrative literature review was conducted using key words “UTI, elderly, and management” to search between 2009 and 2017.

Results: Evidence-based guidelines reveal that if appropriate management of UTI is followed better outcomes would result. There are established interventions to increase provider adherence to UTI management guidelines. Barriers to adherence include lack of awareness about management protocol and resistance pattern.

Conclusion: The literature provides appropriate guidelines regarding appropriate management of urinary tract infection. There is a proposed algorithm based on the revised McGeer criteria for UTI in long-term care settings. When working with the geriatric population, health care workers need to be mindful of complex medical conditions in addition to acute infections at rise, like urinary tract infections.

Key words: urinary tract infection, elderly, management

 

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