Presenter Information

Hannah RutzickFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of obesity is substantially increasing among children in the United States. Despite current interventions used by families and pediatricians, a knowledge gap exists regarding the use of modern technology as a strategy to increase physical activity and prevent/treat childhood obesity.

Objective: The purpose of this review is to explore the influences of modern technology and the media on childhood obesity.

Methods: This integrative review evaluates the evidence from investigational studies that have examined the influences of modern technology on childhood obesity. The effects of the media as a contributing factor was also explored. PsycInfo, ProQuest and CINAHL were the databases used to search for studies that have been published in the last 10 years using the key words: America, childhood, media, obesity, overweight, pediatric and technology. The ages of the children in the research studies ranged from 6-17 years. Modern technology involved primarily computers, smartphones, internet-based applications and active video games. The Whittemore and Knafl (2005) framework was utilized to synthesize and organize the research.

Results: A correlation was found between the amount of time engaged in sedentary pursuits (television viewing, computer use, video games, etc.) and body mass index (BMI) in children. Physical activity in the form of interactive video games demonstrated a valuable method of energy expenditure among children. Additionally, the use of social media platforms and smartphone applications designed for health and fitness promoted healthy behaviors and encouraged physical activity.

Conclusions: Modern technology may potentially benefit healthy behavior in children between the ages of 6 and 17 years, and be a resource to educate healthcare professionals, families and teachers regarding the benefits of technology as a method to prevent childhood obesity.

Key Words: America, childhood, media, obesity, overweight, pediatric, technology

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Effects of Technology and Media On Childhood Obesity

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of obesity is substantially increasing among children in the United States. Despite current interventions used by families and pediatricians, a knowledge gap exists regarding the use of modern technology as a strategy to increase physical activity and prevent/treat childhood obesity.

Objective: The purpose of this review is to explore the influences of modern technology and the media on childhood obesity.

Methods: This integrative review evaluates the evidence from investigational studies that have examined the influences of modern technology on childhood obesity. The effects of the media as a contributing factor was also explored. PsycInfo, ProQuest and CINAHL were the databases used to search for studies that have been published in the last 10 years using the key words: America, childhood, media, obesity, overweight, pediatric and technology. The ages of the children in the research studies ranged from 6-17 years. Modern technology involved primarily computers, smartphones, internet-based applications and active video games. The Whittemore and Knafl (2005) framework was utilized to synthesize and organize the research.

Results: A correlation was found between the amount of time engaged in sedentary pursuits (television viewing, computer use, video games, etc.) and body mass index (BMI) in children. Physical activity in the form of interactive video games demonstrated a valuable method of energy expenditure among children. Additionally, the use of social media platforms and smartphone applications designed for health and fitness promoted healthy behaviors and encouraged physical activity.

Conclusions: Modern technology may potentially benefit healthy behavior in children between the ages of 6 and 17 years, and be a resource to educate healthcare professionals, families and teachers regarding the benefits of technology as a method to prevent childhood obesity.

Key Words: America, childhood, media, obesity, overweight, pediatric, technology