Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

BENEFITS OF EXERCISE FOR SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS

Heather Young

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Barbra Harris, RN, PhD. & Dr. Kim Amer, RN, PhD.

Background: Several studies have provided evidence to support the benefits of exercise in offering protection from depression and as an intervention in the treatment of mental illness. Exercise in mental illness is not only beneficial to the mental health of the patients, studies have also shown that patients with a mental illness are at a significantly higher risk of physical health concerns and complications and exercise can help decrease many of those complications.

Objective: The purpose of this literature review is to synthesize the research on exercise in severe mental illness by answering the following research questions: What are the health outcomes of integrating an exercise program with patients diagnosed with severe mental illness? What are the essential components or barriers of an effective exercise program for patients diagnosed with a severe mental illness?

Methods: The databases utilized were PubMed, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) Complete, PsycINFO, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. Many terms were used in a combination of searches, including: Exercise, Benefits, Severe Mental Illness, and Physical Activity. An extensive search of several combinations of these key terms was performed, and sufficient literature was found.

Results: After examining the literature, the following themes were found to be relevant: positive benefits mentally and physically, a therapeutic relationship between the patient and staff plays a major role in the positive outcomes, and different types of exercise used to improve mental and physical health in SMI.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that exercise used along with pharmacotherapy has many mental, emotional, and physical benefits. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between exercise in mental illness to clarify its effects on mental outcomes and the correlation between exercise and physical improvements.

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Benefits of Exercise in Severe Mental Illness

BENEFITS OF EXERCISE FOR SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS

Heather Young

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Barbra Harris, RN, PhD. & Dr. Kim Amer, RN, PhD.

Background: Several studies have provided evidence to support the benefits of exercise in offering protection from depression and as an intervention in the treatment of mental illness. Exercise in mental illness is not only beneficial to the mental health of the patients, studies have also shown that patients with a mental illness are at a significantly higher risk of physical health concerns and complications and exercise can help decrease many of those complications.

Objective: The purpose of this literature review is to synthesize the research on exercise in severe mental illness by answering the following research questions: What are the health outcomes of integrating an exercise program with patients diagnosed with severe mental illness? What are the essential components or barriers of an effective exercise program for patients diagnosed with a severe mental illness?

Methods: The databases utilized were PubMed, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) Complete, PsycINFO, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. Many terms were used in a combination of searches, including: Exercise, Benefits, Severe Mental Illness, and Physical Activity. An extensive search of several combinations of these key terms was performed, and sufficient literature was found.

Results: After examining the literature, the following themes were found to be relevant: positive benefits mentally and physically, a therapeutic relationship between the patient and staff plays a major role in the positive outcomes, and different types of exercise used to improve mental and physical health in SMI.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that exercise used along with pharmacotherapy has many mental, emotional, and physical benefits. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between exercise in mental illness to clarify its effects on mental outcomes and the correlation between exercise and physical improvements.

 

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