Presenter Information

Victoria BaylisFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

For both the mother and the infant, the risks of smoking during pregnancy are numerous and have been studied for many decades. Despite this, some women still continue to smoke during pregnancy. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to identify contributing factors that influence women to smoke during pregnancy and to identify the factors that are modifiable by healthcare providers. This literature review acts as an additional resource that health providers may utilize in order to better understand why their patients continue to smoke and to inform their patients regarding smoking cessation during pregnancy. A computer-based search was conducted using CINAHL, PsycInfo, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The search retrieved 31 studies that involved expectant mothers and the factors influencing them to smoke. There were 49 total factors found to influence smoking during pregnancy. Five concepts of the Health Belief Model were used to group the data: modifying variables (19 factors), perceived seriousness (6 factors), perceived susceptibility (3 factors), perceived barriers (18 factors), and self-efficacy (3 factors). All of the 49 factors identified in this review can be targeted or modified by healthcare providers. In order to provide effective support, healthcare providers should participate in professional education regarding appropriate smoking cessation screenings, patient education, and referrals to smoking cessation programs.

Keywords: expectant mothers, pregnant, health beliefs, maternal attitudes, perceptions, attitude to health, cigarette smoking, and smoking cessation

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Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Factors That Influence Smoking During Pregnancy: An Integrative Literature Review

For both the mother and the infant, the risks of smoking during pregnancy are numerous and have been studied for many decades. Despite this, some women still continue to smoke during pregnancy. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to identify contributing factors that influence women to smoke during pregnancy and to identify the factors that are modifiable by healthcare providers. This literature review acts as an additional resource that health providers may utilize in order to better understand why their patients continue to smoke and to inform their patients regarding smoking cessation during pregnancy. A computer-based search was conducted using CINAHL, PsycInfo, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The search retrieved 31 studies that involved expectant mothers and the factors influencing them to smoke. There were 49 total factors found to influence smoking during pregnancy. Five concepts of the Health Belief Model were used to group the data: modifying variables (19 factors), perceived seriousness (6 factors), perceived susceptibility (3 factors), perceived barriers (18 factors), and self-efficacy (3 factors). All of the 49 factors identified in this review can be targeted or modified by healthcare providers. In order to provide effective support, healthcare providers should participate in professional education regarding appropriate smoking cessation screenings, patient education, and referrals to smoking cessation programs.

Keywords: expectant mothers, pregnant, health beliefs, maternal attitudes, perceptions, attitude to health, cigarette smoking, and smoking cessation